GrumpyGramma's Knitting Room


#1

I keep losing things so I decided to start a list of useful links and maybe other things as well. If anyone else has something useful to add, feel free, please.

How to join your yarn by making a double knot
I tried it, I like it.

Faux Side Seams
Side seams are good to have in sweaters but how do you have them when you knit in the round to avoid them? Mystery solved!

Hooked on Needles
MGM’s site with tutorials for crochet, Tunisian crochet, knitting, and much more.

REVISED unified index for TECHknitting.blogspot.com


Sew in a zipper

[B]Knitter’s Graph Paper[/B]

Garter Stitch Tab - Starting a Shawl

[B]Stitch Patterns[/B]

How to Knit the Indian Cross Stitch

Knit Hit Laces Archives

Lace Knitting Stitches
Synthesized from multiple sources on the net and the books

[U]Waffle Stitch in the round[/U]

Rounds 1 & 2: [K2, p2] to end.
Round 3: K all sts.
Round 4: P all sts.
Repeat these four rounds for Waffle Stitch.
[U]
Waffle Rib in the round[/U]

Waffle Rib (multiple of 5 sts)

Rnds 1 and 2: Knit.
Rnds 3-6: *K1, p3, k1; rep from * to end.
Rep Rows 1-6 for pat.

How To Knit Mock Cables
2 and 3 stitch twisted stitch mini cables

Twisted drop stitch

Eunny Jang video, elongated stitches

Twisted stitches/mini cables/mock cables

[B]Joining in the round[/B]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cG8y38itObw&feature=related

[B]Changing Colors[/B]

Vertical Stripe Scarf–Intarsia
http://www.tata-tatao.to/knit/plainmaf/e-vstripe2.html

Knitting in ends

Jogless Stripes in the Round - KDTV 311 with Eunny Jang

Very good video, the slip st is good for the first color change with multiple rows of each color, after that I like the one from planetpurl.
How can she knit so fast???

How to Knit Smooth Jogless Stripes in the Round planetpurl

Very easy to do and works well.

[B]Cast Ons[/B]

Adding cast on stitches


Using fewer loops and taking up the slack

COWYAK provisional cast on

Extra Stretchy Cast On for Ribbing
Interesting. I might try it.

How to Knit the Guernsey Cast On
" This method of starting a project is a decorative cast on traditionally used when making Guernsey sweaters. It consists of a series of knots connected by short strands of yarn that make small eyelets along the edge of your work."

How To Knit Emily Ocker’s Circular Cast-On

[B]Bind Offs[/B]

Jeny’s Suprisingly Stretchy Bind Off planetpurl

TECHknitting - Ordinary chain bind off, part 3: binding off circular knits

Decrease bind off

Crochet bind off

When I’ve used a crochet bind off I guess I used a smaller hook as it produces a less stretchy bind off. Sometimes I want a less stretchy bind off to add stability.

[B]Joining ends, grafting[/B]

Kitchener
Kitchener for ribbing

[B]Increasing[/B]
Yarn Over 101
Increasing Your Options
Raglan Style Increases, eylets, yarnovers, etc., with excellent illustrations and how tos.

[B]Decreasing[/B]

How to Reduce Stitches Evenly Across a Row
http://www.thedietdiary.com/knittingfiend/tools/EvenlySpace.html

[B]Double knitting/Fair Isle[/B]

Ingrid’s Steeked Sweater 101
Ingrid said: I just wanted everyone to see that you don’t burst into flame if you cut knitting!
Not having tried steeks, I’ll have to take that on faith! :slight_smile:

What You Didn’t Know You Needed to Know
Increasing in Pattern, Purling With Two Colours, other goodies.

The Two-handed Fair Isle Technique
http://www.philosopherswool.com/Pages/Twohandedvideo.htm


This video will teach you how to master color knitting in rows or rounds with ONE thread of yarn only using an astonishing simple technique.–Caption from the video
I think I might try this.

[B]Socks[/B]

Learn to Knit Toe-Up Socks, Part 3
Very Pink Knits - Starts with a provisional cast on of 1/2 the total stitches for the instep and uses short rows to shape the toe. When short rows are completed, live stitches from the provisional cast on are put otn to begin knitting in the round.

Easy Toe Up Sock Cast On
This looks good in the video, must try it.

Shandeh’s Video Tutorial on Knitting Ankle Socks

Lifestyle Toe Up Socks- No Swatch Needed
Silver’s Sock Class
Cat’s Sweet Tomato Heel- a Heel Tutorial
Afterthought heel
Step 1 - Setting up with waste yarn
Step 2 - Picking up the stitches
Step 3 - Knit the heel

Reinforce toes, heels and how to darn holes

For turkish cast on I was taught with these last socks (I have 6 cast on in various stages) we wrap 8, knit across the first needle, then using the tail and the working yarn knit around both needles. Then start your increases knitting the double stitches as one each time. Easy once you get the hang of it.


____________http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1361481#post1361481
Jan

KNITFreedom - Toe Up Socks: When To Start Increases For Fleegle Heel

[B]Mittens/Gloves[/B]

Kelley’s Mitten Class

Intro

[B]Center pull butterfly[/B]

http://www.planetpurl.com/community/…&vid_id=100027

[B]Pattern generators[/B]

The Yoke-u-lator

http://www.thedietdiary.com/blog/lucia/1823
This is the yoke-u-lator program to create the pattern for the circular yoke sweater. Top down.

[B]Short Rows[/B]
[I]Blessing or curse? [/I]

Short Rows: Shadow wraps

The Fleegle short rows

YO Short Rows Tutorial

Rox Ask a knitter short rows
http://www.ravelry.com/twir/86/ask-a-knitter-26

Cat’s short row heel tutorial, no w&t

Techknitting short rows 101

Double stitch short row heels
Something to try. When short rows are involved I’ll try just about anything once.

[B]For New Knitters[/B]

How to avoid knitting the wrong way

[B]Miscellaneous[/B]

Grafting stitches off the needle

Continental knitting demo
[B]
Sweater Sleeves[/B]
Ravellings on the knitted sleeve – Part I

"To some knitters or would-be designers, there is nothing so daunting as designing a knitted sleeve that fits.

The problem with sleeves – whether the simple, boxy drop-shoulder style, or those involving more intricate shaping – is that there always seems to be a whiff of uncertainty about the finished product."


#2

Did you want this thread in the blog forum?

Yeah, these threads do tend to get spread all over. There are so e sticky posts at the top of the various forums with useful links and info, too. It’s just separated by topic rather than in one place. We don’t like to have too many sticky posts because its a pain to scroll down to read posts if we do.


#3

Yeah, I meant to put it here. Should it be somewhere else? I just thought a place where I could find things would be good for me and maybe someone else would find it useful too.


#4

No, this is fine, GG. I just wanted to make sure. This forum gets used by accident sometimes. :teehee:


#5

thank you for posting!


#6

[B]Center pull butterfly[/B]

http://www.planetpurl.com/community/index.php?page=videos&section=view&vid_id=100027

[B]Pattern generators[/B]

The Yoke-u-lator

http://www.thedietdiary.com/blog/lucia/1823
This is the yoke-u-lator program to create the pattern for the circular yoke sweater. Top down.


#7

Using a crochet hook instead of a third needle and working a crocheted bind off on stitches from both needles produces a firmer “seam” where less give is wanted as at a shoulder, and can actually be used decoratively if worked on the RS.


#8

Okay, I’m bookmarking this collection for sure… looks like a great selection of Very Useful Stuff! Thanks!


#9

My mentors are wise in the ways of sock knitting. To them I am most grateful.

Judy’s Magic Cast-On

[B]Socks[/B]

Shandeh’s Video Tutorial on Knitting Ankle Socks

Overview of knitting a toe-up sock

Lifestyle Toe Up Socks- No Swatch Needed
Silver’s Sock Class
Cat’s Sweet Tomato Heel- a Heel Tutorial
Afterthought heel
Step 1 - Setting up with waste yarn
Step 2 - Picking up the stitches
Step 3 - Knit the heel

Reinforce toes, heels and how to darn holes

For turkish cast on I was taught with these last socks (I have 6 cast on in various stages) we wrap 8, knit across the first needle, then using the tail and the working yarn knit around both needles. Then start your increases knitting the double stitches as one each time. Easy once you get the hang of it.


____________http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1361481#post1361481
Jan

KNITFreedom - Toe Up Socks: When To Start Increases For Fleegle Heel

Note to self: Fleegle heel is Ok, don’t think I like it as well as the regular short row heel. Will try Sweet Tomato Heel next.


#10

Here are a few from my bookmarks:

Sewing in armholes: http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEspring06/FEATspr06TT.html

Converting pictures to knitting: http://www.picstoknits.co.uk/

Lion Brands glossary of stitches: http://www.lionbrand.com/cgi-bin/patternFinder.fcgi?search=Search&store=%2Fstores%2Feyarn&resultPageTemplate=ResultPage.html&resultItemTemplate=ResultItem.txt&noResultPageTemplate=NoResultPage.html&case=no&primaryServer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lionbrand.com&minPrice=0&noBoolean=1&searchText=stitchfinder&Go.x=0&Go.y=0&sT=1

Traveling Loop (if Magic Loop just won’t do): http://impeccableknits.wordpress.com/traveling-loop/

German short rows: http://impeccableknits.wordpress.com/traveling-loop/ AND http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KooKdm0YBbw

Chart makers: http://jacquie.typepad.com/Charts/knitChart.htm AND http://www.innaz.com/cgi-bin/makechart/makechart.cgi

all about increases: http://www.twistcollective.com/collection/index.php/component/content/article/35-features/1041-increasing-your-options

Knitting calculator: http://www.jimmybeanswool.com/secure-html/onlineec/knittingCalculator.asp

How to decrease evenly: http://www.thedietdiary.com/knittingfiend/tools/EvenlySpace.html

Stretchy bind-offs: http://www.knittingdaily.com/blogs/needles/archive/2010/03/25/stretchy-bind-offs.aspx

Knitting in the round straight: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPGXNoG0fjA&feature=related

Short row shoulder caps: http://dailyskein.wordpress.com/2009/11/25/short-row-shoulder-caps/

Top-down seamless inset sleeves: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv3YDmqnQzA

Picking up stitches on a straight edge: http://knitty.com/ISSUEwinter04/FEATwin04TT.html

Picking up stitches on a curved edge: http://knitty.com/ISSUEspring05/FEATspr05TT.html


#11

Top-down seamless inset sleeves: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv3YDmqnQzA

This caught my eye right away. I’d been looking for it, I had read about it being possible to do set in sleeves seamlessly, and then didn’t bookmark it and lost the link. I’d not found a video at all. Thank you so much! Some of the others I’ll have to look at later. I think someone besides us might find these links helpful, it’s a great collection of useful things.


#12

GG: The short row shoulder caps link (the one above the one you mentioned) is also a good one for top-down set-in seamless sleeves. I think I used her formula and directions, but then watched the video to get a visual. Oh, and I used German short rows instead of “regular” short rows (love the German version :inlove:).

It worked great, but then I decided the arm hole was too large (even though I had the same measurements as the pattern), so out it all came and back down the froggie went to the underarms where I added some more length to the sides. Nonetheless, it was good practice and although I’ll have to read and watch everything again before the next try, it was still worthwhile–maybe–hopefully.

I may have duped some links here, but perhaps there are some new ones, too.

Thanks for posting this useful thread!


#13

I’m glad you mentioned the German short rows, I thought when I try it that’s what I’ll use, I couldn’t see any reason they wouldn’t work but who knows? I find in knitting an old saying applies: Expect the unexpected. As for this being a useful thread, I found myself having to search again and again for the same things because I forget to bookmark them or my bookmarks aren’t organized so that I remember where to look. really appreciate your contribution, by just grabbing the first one that caught my eye I’ve already learned something.

Some links I know I want to add here were, I believe, posted by the lady in PJs and they are for gloves, mittens, and hats. I can’t find them and it’s frustrating.


#14

Mitten measurements
A fellow knitter asked me about this. I thought I would post it for anybody who’s knitting mittens and aren’t sure of the sizes needed. I don’t like following a pattern. I’m one of those knitters who likes it broken down into inches. Knit by the inch. I knit charity mittens, so here are my measurements based on experience.

Use a 1-3 inch cuff for all sizes.

Distance from top of cuff to thumb opening:
Ages 3-5 1 1/2 inches
Ages 6-8 1 1/2 inches
Ages 8-10 1 3/4 inches
Small adult 2 1/4 inches
Medium adult 2 1/2 inches
Large adult 2 3/4 inches

Thumb length will be the same as the above.

Total length of mitten from top of cuff where stockinette begins to top of mitten:
Ages 3-5 4 1/2 inches
Ages 6-8 5 inches
Ages 8-10 5 1/2 inches
Adult small 7 inches
Adult medium 7 1/2 inches
Adult large 8 inches

Add one to three inches to these measurements including the cuff length you choose.

I stop a half inch short of these thumb opening to top of mitten measurements and divide these stitches in half for magic loop. You can place a marker at the halfway point if using straights or double points. K1, ssk, knit to three stitches before marker, k2tog, k1. Repeat for stitches after the marker. I do this on every row until I’m down to about 8 stitches, cut the yarn, draw through the loops, and fasten off. These decreases come out to about half an inch.

On any size chart you find online, they never tell you the distance from the top of the cuff to the thumb opening. This is going to be the same measurement as for the thumb length. Hope this helps.


#15

I came across this in one of the algebra courses I edited a few years ago and found it all kinds of helpful for knitting and crocheting (figuring out the number of stitches to cast on for ribbing, modifying patterns, etc.):

A number is divisible by 3 if the sum of the digits is divisible by 3.

A number is divisible by 4 if the last two digits of the number are divisible by 4.

A number is divisible by 6 if the number is divisible by both 2 and 3.

A number is divisible by 9 if the sum of the digits is divisible by 9.


#16

I realized basic algebra had practical applications at the fabric store many years ago and again with knitting and crocheting. I couldn’t do algebra until my late 20s and still struggle with anything more complicated than x=1! LOL


#17

Here’s a chart from Bev’s site that’s good for knitting or crocheting for babies, toddlers, and children. I used this chart for knitting a pair of wool pants for Emma. Perfect fit except for the leg length. But she’s tall for her age. Takes after Daddy who is 6’ 4". Next time I will know to add two inches.

http://www.bevscountrycottage.com/size-chart.html


#18

As far as hat size, what can I say? This is Wisconsin and we need something that will cover the ears. So I make my hats longer. No ear skimming hats only suitable for walking along a California beach. We’re talking below zero temps.

I cheat when doing a new pattern, knit or crochet. I look at the photo of the hat to see where it comes on the ear of the model. If it looks too short, I will estimate how much and do one or two inches extra, whatever I think the measurement is, before I do my decreases. My hats generally measure 10 1/2 to 11 inches. I like a three inch cover for double coverage on the ears.

Here’s my Go To pattern that I made up myself and always use. I use worsted weight (preferrably wool) yarn and a #8 circular needle. I do Magic Loop. I cast on 90 stitches. I join the circle and do a k1,p1 rib throughout the entire cap. This helps the hat to hug the head and adjusts to fit the wearer without bulging. I do this rib for 10 1/2 inches. Then I do a series of decreases. They come out to about 1/2 inch. K2 tog, p2 together for the first row. The next two rows are k1,p1 across. The next two rows are k2 tog all across the row. Cut the yarn. Put yarn on a tapestry needle and run it through the remaining stitches. Draw up and fasten off. If you want a two inch cuff, rib the hat for 9 1/2 inches. If you want a one inch cuff, rib it for 8 1/2 before beginning the decreases. The hats seem a bit tight, but they eventually stretch as all knitting does.


#19

Me again. Sometimes I want a pattern but don’t know what I want. Yes, I can go to Ravelry. But what I really like, especially when I’m bored, is Stumbleupon. You click the Stumbleupon box for Crochet and it gives you crochet sites. They’re random. Sometimes they’re pay pattern sites. Sometimes they have instructional videos. I might find some cute amurgami. It’s always an adventure to see what might come up.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/


#20

This is for crochet. Here’s an alternative to chaining and crocheting in a circle or to the magic circle. I don’t like those because the hole is always coming open and you’re constantly readjusting it. This is called the Sloppy Slip Knot or the Chain 2 method. Once the hole is closed up, it stays closed up.