What is the meaning behind right side and wrong side?

Hmmm… this seems to be a very common question for beginners. Unfortunately, even though I’ve read many threads relating to the topic, my question still hasn’t been answered. I’m 16 years old and I received a “Knitting for Beginners” sort of thing from my auntie who knows I like crafts like crocheting and such. I’m no pro at crocheting so I still don’t know the difference between right and wrong side. I understand that right side is the side that people see and wrong side is the side you feel. But I don’t what the point of right and wrong side is in directions. Is there something special you have to do to create the patterns on the two sides, or is it just a way to show you which row you’re on?

Also, the project I’m working on (a summer capelet) says that I should make “two pieces according to the directions”. Does that mean I will have follow the entire set of directions two separate times or follow the set of directions once to make the entire thing?

I didn’t realize knitting was so confusing… :wall:

Kumashe,

A right side is usually designated for pieces that require shaping work, ie. increases and decreases, or certain stitch patterns, etc, as this side will be the side that displays these features. If you start to play around with your knitting and various increases etc, you will see the effect that they have on the RS as opposed to the WS of an item.

Also, the project I’m working on (a summer capelet) says that I should make “two pieces according to the directions”. Does that mean I will have follow the entire set of directions two separate times or follow the set of directions once to make the entire thing?

This means that you follow the entire set of directions two separate times.

some items (a scarf say) are often worn so that both sides show.

many(but not all by any means!) scarves are designed so both sides look, if not identical, very similar.

other items (hats, sweaters, cardigans) have a right (outside) and a wrong side (inside) OFTEN, but not always there is a marked difference in appearance between the 2 sides.

sometimes (garter stitch for example) there is no obvious difference, but shaping or buttonholes will be worked, via directions, on the right

what use old timers do is this, take a safety pin, and a short lenght of ribbon (an inch or two) and pin ribbon onto one side (with safety pin)
this side (ribbon side) is the right side.
the other side (that looks for all intents and purposes) identical, is the wrong side.

and as many a knitter knows, HATS are one of the most wonderful things in the world to knit. they come in ONE’s. and they are way smaller than scarves. sweaters needs fronts (and backs) and sleeves… socks come in pairs, and so do gloves and mittens…
almost every knitted garment requires knitting 2 or more peices… before they are done.

That is one of several very good reasons to read (if you can’t afford to buy) the knitting books of Elizabeth Zimmerman and Maggie Righetti… both of them advocate knitting sweaters in 1 peice.

Ok, so you have to knit the sleeves seperately and join them to the body to make the one piece) but the front and back are knit as ONE till (or from) the underarms… and it just SEEMs like less work.

It might seem like forever to make both pieces, but stick with it… there is a special sense of satisfaction wearing something you made yourself.