Uncommon abbreviations?

I have some patterns here and am having a lot of difficulty finding the abbreviations meanings.

yns

This is the main one I am having trouble with. It says the pattern is very simple, and the stitch pattern is only from 1988 (so far as I know), and it just may be VERY simple, but I can’t figure it out.

ETA:

This is from a Waffle brioche stitch pattern. I’ve also found the pattern (in images) to resemble (in my eyes, EXACTLY) the Double Brioche Stitch, The 3 Dimensional Honeycomb stitch, The English Brioche Stitch, and the Brioche stitch from my old pattern (which is probably the english one).

:?? How is it used? Could it just be ‘yarns?’

It’s from a waffle brioche stitch. It says

Prep: K2 yns, sl1, yon, k1
Row1: K2, slyo k2
Row2: K1 yns sl1 yon, k2tog k1
Row3: K1 k2, slyo k1
Row 4: K1 k2tog, yns sl1 yon k1
Tow final rows:
Row 1: Repeat row 1
Row 2: K1 k1, k2tog k1

I was having trouble with “yon” but I found that that means “yarn over needle”

There’s also a chart with the pattern, but I’ve never read charts so I don’t know how to read it.

I found this. Maybe it will help?

I’m surprised the pattern doesn’t explain the abbreviations.

The book explains the abbreviations the author likes to use, but this particular one is not included. She also explains instances a simple abbreviation is provided and gives a few examples, but I cannot for the life of me figure out what it means. :?? There’s even chart explanations, but I still don’t know what it means :wall:

This is also because I wanted a modern adaptation of a brioche stitch from an 1800s pattern I am planning on using for something. The pattern from that one is very thorough, but it didn’t say “waffle brioche”. However, when trying to find modern stitch patterns for it, I found that the picture provided in the pattern I am using looks just like the waffle brioche stitch in this book.

This pattern also explains the abbreviation “slyo” before the pattern…I’ll be darned. It’s probably right under my nose.

ETA"
I wonder if it means yarn over next stitch. but why wouldnt there be an ‘o’?

I just found another stitch pattern which uses it also. It’s the first I’ve found in the book. it’s called the three and one stitch

Prep: Knit
Row1: K3, sl1yfs, k1
Row2: K1 sl1yns, k3
Row3: K1, sl1yfs, k2, k1
Row4: K1, k2, sl1yns, k1
Final Row: Knit

Here’s a webpage I found showing how to do the Double Brioche which looks exactly like the one I am looking for. I am still curious as to what “yns” means though. http://www.thedietdiary.com/blog/index.php?p=243