Should I knit edges of sweater differently?

I am going to try to knit a sweater in pieces and sew it together. Should I knit the edges with a selvedge stitch? I read this makes it easier to sew together. Is that true? If so how? thank you in advance for helping me.

There are differences of opinion on this. I never do a special edge stitch (slipped) for a sweater. I took a finishing class and kind of expected to hear this message, but the gal who taught the class also did not like them for sewing up with the mattress stitch. It was her opinion that the slipped stitch made it harder to sew up.

That’s what I’ve heard - a slip stich edge makes it harder to sew or leaves gaps. Just do a regular knit or purl st on the edges and they’ll be hidden inside the seam anyway. A slip stitch is to give a chain edge on something where you see the edge.

Hi, I make a selvedge st for seaming by knitting the first and last st
of every row. For example in stockinette stitch, RS knit across, then
on the WS k1, purl to last st, k1. This creates a column of garter
st up the edges that is clearly distinguishable from the stockinette
and makes it easier for seaming.

I agree that the slipped stitch edge is not as easy to seam so I
wouldn’t recommend that :slight_smile:

Libbie

Thanks everyone for your help. So if I understand correctly, it is not mandatory to use a selvedge edge, but if I do use a knit edge and that would make seaming easier. Does that mean I use the knit stitch to seam, or go in one stitch and use the bar between the stockinette? I don’t understand how the knit edge makes it easier. Thanks again, I tend to be a perfectionist and want this to turn out well.

I also never do slipped sts for seaming (weak sts) but always do a st st sel.

cam

So far we have one who likes a garter edge, and Cam are you saying you don’t do anything special if you are working in st st?

Carolb, Libbie is saying that her opinion is that a one stitch garter edge makes it easier to sew up (I haven’t tried that), Suzeeq and I are saying we just do stockinette to the edge if that is the stitch. And I’m thinking that is what Cam is saying too, but I’m not sure. We find it easy to do that way and gives a good result.

This has been most helpful to me. I am going to just go with the regular stockinette stitch since most of you use that method. I will let you know how it works out. Thanks again. I am finally getting used to learning how to post this on this forum.

Cam are you saying you don’t do anything special if you are working in st st?

I always do st st regardless of what other st patt the item might have. (Of course, if the project has st st, then it’s just a continuation.) I find st st most clearly delineates where the sel ends and the rest of the sts begin (the exception being st st). I’m one of those rare few who actually likes seaming and find that being consistent with my sel makes it just that much easier.

cam

I always do st st regardless of what other st patt the item might have.
Thanks for the answer. Would you do that even if it was reverse st st, or garter? Or are you talking about more complicated pattern stitches? I like to learn what works well for other knitters I admire.

Would you do that even if it was reverse st st, or garter? Or are you talking about more complicated pattern stitches?

Given so much of what I do is st st I’m trying to recall. LOL Best I can recollect I have a ‘thing’ about K on RS, P on WS for sel. I did a Katia cardi that had lots of rev st st but it eventually became st st at some point so kept it consistent (K/RS, P/WS throughout). If, from the RS, the sel always looks the same, I just know where to insert my tap ndl at any point along the way. So whether it’s

KKK|K or
PPP|K or
KPK|K

I’m always aware my seaming goes here |.

Of course, I’m a big fan of slipped st edges on the likes of scarves, afghans, etc. (Sl 1st st pw…)

HTH,
cam