New kid on the block with questions

My mother made all of us learn how to crochet at an early age. And though we made some nice items, I was always more impressed with knitted items. I was always told how hard it was to knit, and used to watch the “serious knitters” counting and working their magic etc… (Please know this is not a slam to people who crochet).

Well this Christmas I saw my next store neighbor knitting and she told me she had recently learned. I told her that I always wanted to learn, but was leary as I had heard it was very difficult. Two days later… I started my first project ( a scarf). I think I pulled it out and started over 4 times… just because… well you know how things are in the beginning… and I like things to be right. I guess I am a bit of a perfectionist. I found a mistake several inches back and pulled the whole thing out and decided to start over because I did not like the first 3-4 rows. Either way, I got past that hurdle and am trucking right along, but I do have a couple of questions.

First Question: Afgans. I am wanting to knit a baby blanket for a co-worker who is due in May. I am going to have to grab a pattern etc, but I am curious as to how I am going to be making something so “wide” as it is more than can fit on one kneedle? I assume there is a special method for this or special needles? Or is it that the pieces are in sections and “Weaved” together? Quite clearly some afgans are not “weaved”?

And now that I used the “W” word (weaving)… I have seen this term used in some pattern descriptions where it tells you to “weave” pieces together. Is there an example of how to do this somewhere?

Should I assume that when I see sweaters with arms, necks, and wrists with completely different patterns that these are all “weaved” together?

Blocking? Hmm I would like to know what this term actually means and how to do it? I heard discussion of it on here, but was not really sure what it relates to? I do know that is supposedly makes garmets appear neater?

There I have said a lot, and I am sure you all are itching to get me pointed in the right direction. Be easy on me now, because… well I am an old softy after all.

All the best,

Jeff :wink:

Welcome to the forum! We seem to getting lots of new “guys” lately! Cool!

You need a circular needle to knit large items like an afghan. You knit flat and treat it just like regular needles by switching hands, but you’ve got the bulk of the item on the cord. How big the item is determines the length of the cord. For the hat I’m making I’m using a 16 in circ, but for an afghan you’d want something larger.

Some things are seamed, but if you use circular needles you can knit in the round with no seams! Once you get used to them you’ll love them. I use them for most everything whether it’s flat or in the round.

I haven’t blocked anything yet myself. If you use the search at the top of the forum you can find all kinds of info. :wink: There are also a ton of tutorials on how to do things at the top of the page…it’s a good place to start then come back with your questions. :smiley:

Welcome!

While some afghans are sewn together after knitting, most are knit flat, but on a circular knitting needle. You just use the circ as though it were flat, turning at the end of each row.

And now that I used the “W” word (weaving)… I have seen this term used in some pattern descriptions where it tells you to “weave” pieces together. Is there an example of how to do this somewhere?

There are quite a few ways to join knitted pieces – there’s actual weaving, or grafting, but usually mattress stitch will do the trick. There are videos of many seaming techniques near the bottom of this page.

Should I assume that when I see sweaters with arms, necks, and wrists with completely different patterns that these are all “weaved” together?

Not always! There are wonderful ways to knit a sweater so youdon’t have to do any seaming at all! :smiley:

Blocking? Hmm I would like to know what this term actually means and how to do it? I heard discussion of it on here, but was not really sure what it relates to? I do know that is supposedly makes garmets appear neater?

The need to block depends on your fiber. Blocking is basically steaming or washing your piece and drying it, sometimes pinning it so it dries to the correct dimensions. If you’re using acrylic, not necessary. Using natural fibers? recommended. I’ve also found that it makes seaming a while lot easier if you block the pieces first.

HTH! :smiley:

Isn’t it interesting how so many people seem to be getting into knitting?! Most people seem to be:
A) obsessed with it
B) totally uninterested in it

Very little middle ground, or so it seems to me in my casual observations!

Regarding blocking, I’ve only ever done this when knitting a garment to ensure that two pieces to be seamed together were consistent. Baby blankets, scarves, afghans, never seemed to require it.

Good luck in your knit-quest!