Moss vs seed

I need to understand the difference between moss & seed stitch. why do some patterns indicate alternating rows as k1, p1 to end; in which case the next row knits the knits & purls the purls. Other patterns indicated alternating rows as row k1, p1; row 2 k1, p1; row 3 repeats row 1, row 4 repeats row 2 and so on?

I am going to make a sweater that indicates seed stitch in the pattern, which i thought easy, but I’m confused about the correct way to knit the pattern. Thanks for the help…:slight_smile:

I hope someone else will weigh in on this one in case I’m wrong, but here’s my take:

Moss and seed stitch are the same thing. The reason some patterns say k1p1 and then the next row also k1p1, and some say k1p1 and next row p1k1 is because if you have an even number of stitches, when you turn it around you’ll have to start on the opposite stitch from what you started the previous row with (row 1 k1p1, row 2 p1k1) but if you have an odd number of stitches, you’ll just repeat the same row over and over.

I think I got that right… :slight_smile:

For the seed stitch you would knit the purls and purl the knits. I hope that makes sense and good luck.

Knit the knits and purl the purls won’t produce seed stitch. It means that you knit or purl the stitches as they appear on the needle. So, if you K1, P1 to the end of the row, and then K the knits and purl the purl, you will get k1 P1 ribbing.

This is because when you see a knit stitch you will knit it, which produces a purl on the other side. When you see a purl stitch, you will purl it, which appears as a knit on the other side.

So if, for example, you knit all the stitches on one side, you would turn your knitting and then all those knit stitches would appear as purls, so you would purl them all. Then you would turn your work and now all the stitches would appear as knits, so you would knit them. (This produces stockinette.)

I hope that makes sense–it’s a fairly simple concept, but one that’s hard to explain.

This will give you seed stitch. However, the way seed stitch is done depends on whether its over an even number or odd number of stitches.

For an even number of stitches:

Row one: *K1, P1. Repeat from * across.
Row two: *P1, K1. Repeat from * across.

Repeat these two rows for pattern.

For an odd number of stitches:

Row one: K1, *P1, K1. Repeat from * across.

Repeat this row.

ETA: Forgot about the moss stitch question. The term moss stitch is sometimes used interchangably with seed stitch, but it also is used for a stitch pattern that looks kind of like an elongated seed stitch. It goes like this:

Cast on an even # of stitches.

Rows 1 and 2: *K1, P1 Repeat from * across.
Rows 3 and 4: *P1, K1 Repeat from * across.

Seed stitch is easy but the terminology used regarding it is sometimes confusing. There is another name, moss stitch that is sometimes used interchangeably too.

why do some patterns indicate alternating rows as k1, p1 to end; in which case the next row knits the knits & purls the purls
If you knit the knits and purl the purls you are not making seed/moss stitch, but regular knit 1, purl 1 ribbing. In ribbing the knits line up over each other on each side and likewise the purl stitches.

Other patterns indicated alternating rows as row k1, p1; row 2 k1, p1; row 3 repeats row 1, row 4 repeats row 2 and so on?
Well, seed/moss stitch is when you alternate a row of knits and purls and on the next and all following rows you put knits over purls and purls over knits. Some instructions write this down over even numbers of stitches and some on odd numbers. The instructions vary a little because of the odd/even issue. If you have vnvnvn v being knit and n being purl. You would have an even number and the next row since that one ended with a purl would need to begin with a purl, since when you turn the end purl over it would be a knit on the second row and require a purl to make a purl over a knit for seed/moss stitch.

If you had vnvnvnv, which would be an odd number, since it ends with a knit, when you turn for the next row a purl would be facing you so you would begin with a knit.

Don’t let all that confuse you. Just remember that seed/moss stitch whether you start with a knit or purl, and no matter how many stitches in a row is always a knit over a purl and a purl over a knit. They should constantly change from knits to purls in each row and then have knits over purls and purls over knits in each following row. That’s it.