Knit Tips & Tricks


#261

errr I’d like to do a Norwegian pattern with blue and white colors.

http://www.freevintageknitting.com/mittens/619-mittens-pattern.html

like this just in horizontally.


#262

Wow! Those look really nice. This site has a video on two color knitting. Go up to Free Videos then Advanced Techniques. Hope it helps. Have fun.


#263

This is considered “stranded” or “Fair-Isle” knitting.
Amy did a video on this here on our website, and you’ll find several other tutorials online. It’s an advanced technique that takes lots of practice. Good luck!


#264

thank you Gertie and Shandeh for your help!!:))


#265

Hi!

This is a super video. It gives the method of Fair Isle knitting that will avoid all floats of yarn on the back of the fabric and give you a nice, neat woven back. I love this one!

http://www.philosopherswool.com/Pages/Twohandedvideo.htm

I sent this to you in a private message as well in case you didn’t check back here. Thanks, by the way, for the great link to those awesome Fair Isle mittens!

Happy knitting,

Ruthie :clink:


#266

Greetings all! My old trick: I make copies of my patterns as I use them. I scan them in to my computer and convert them to a text format that I can edit (removing the extra size units!). When I have a satisfactory copy, I print it out. I scribble notes on it as I go along (e.g., increase by knitting in row below instead of yarn over - yo leaves gaps!). After completing the project, I edit the copy on my computer and also keep the scribbled-up version in a notebook. My new trick: I use mini-craft-clothespins to keep my stitches from migrating along (or off) the cable of a circular needle! I am knitting two sweaters - one a large man’s sweater, the other a top-down cardigan. I was using chrome-plated needles for both and struggling because everytime I pushed stitches up to the tips, they slid back down onto the cable of their own weight! I switched to Knit-Picks wood tips, which was better, but still struggling (I have such a bad arthritis in my left little finger, that I cannot grip the stitches low on the needle tip). Since I use mini-clothes pins when making tiny teddy bears, a bunch of those little pins were right there when the light went on over my head! I now use these little pins to keep the stitches moving along. Just clip them on the cable after pushing the stitches up, and also to keep the work from slipping off the needles altogether. See my photos.


#267

I had the same problem, but solved it by slipping the sleeve stitches to a piece of yarn, drawing it up snug, clipping the first and last stitches together with a safety-pin type stitch marker, clipping the corresponding body stitches the same way, and joining the the clips with small, split-ring stitch markers.


#268

Ever had your knitting basket tipped over (by yourself??)? :hair: I finally I got so crazy keeping my stuff together, I bought a hackle cabinet (online, from Cabela’s, it came unassembled, but putting it together was easy). Oh, a hackle cabinet is a little chest of drawers (on wheels) which is used to store supplies for making fly fishing lures … Half the drawers are the right size for spools of thread, needles, scissors, etc. and the others are good sizes for yarn, half-completed projects, chart keepers, etc.:woohoo: And everything is right next to my rocking chair! If you don’t want to spend that kind of money, a rolling plastic set of storage drawers works (even if it is homely and the drawers are not so conveniently sized).


#269

:!!!:I truly hate DPs (my grandmother taught me to knit on a set of German-silver ones -very heavy, super slippery- hold up the work and the needles fall out)!!! Working the sleeve of a top-downer in the round & trying not to: poke the ends of the needles into the sweater I am knitting, the sweater I am wearing or my eyes, I had an inspiration…:woohoo: Now I am knitting my sleeve on two circular needles (one is a short, fixed needle with small tips). I am so stupid. :doh:I should have thought of this years ago. :gah:


#270

Hello again everyone! First of all I’d like to post a photo of my first work:) that’s what I made so far

http://img576.imageshack.us/i/imgp2987j.jpg/

and I’d like to knit a V-neck for it but I don’t know how to do it:( can anybody help me please?


#271

Hi, Nicky~

This is gorgeous!!! Wowser!!! What a great job you’ve done on this. Check out some v-neck patterns here or on Ravelry and see if you can adjust the pattern to your project. If you have any trouble with it the forum here is just overflowing with knowledgeable and helpful knitters who will be happy to help you finish!

Good luck and let us know how it’s going!

Ruthie


#272

Hello! so I still have a problem with the V-neck :frowning: I still don’t know how to do it:( I tried to find patterns but I didn’t find anything:S Could somebody explain me how to do it?? or find me a pattern? because I have no idea about this:(


#273

I have not knit a sweater so I can’t say which is a good pattern or not, but. have you checked over at www.Ravery.com. You have to join, its free, they have a large number of free patterns for v-neck sweaters.

Also did you post this over at the Pattern Central forum of Knittinghelp?


#274

Nicky10
The Knitting Fools web site has a sweater pattern generatorthat may be of use to you.

As I have said I have not knit any sweaters but as I understand it. Knitting a sweater from the bottom up, when you reach the point the “V” neck is to start, 1/2 of the stitches will be moved to a stitch holder (waste yarn, spare needle, official stitch holder). The live stitches will then be knit, every other row will be reduced by number of stitches necessary to create the width of “V” necessary. Once you have reached the shoulder seam bind the first side off.

Pick up the stitches off the stitch holder and knit the second side as the first side was knit.

I have now exhausted my understanding of sweater knitting.


#275

Oh thanks so much I understand it now!! wohoo thank you very much for your help cacunn!!


#276

Hi, Chris! :waving:

Thanks for the link to the sweater pattern generator! It’s EXACTLY what I’ve been looking for and there it was!

Thanks again and happy knitting!

Ruthie :woohoo:


#277

Make sure you check out all the sweater “patterns” at Knitting Fool

Simple Drop Sleeve Gansey Pattern by the Percentage MethodSimple Drop Set-in Sleeve Pullover Pattern by the Percentage Method

Simple Worked from the Top Raglan Pullover by the Percentage Method


#278

I sympathize with you on the Norweigan pattern. I started this great pattern for my sons but quickly gave up. http://www.allcrafts.net/fjs.htm?url=www.helloyarn.com/wecallthempirates.pdf
This is a bit over my head, but I think I could do it if I just went slow and did it one line at a time. It’s currently abandoned, but I may try it again soon. What I would suggest you do that I didn’t was to print the chart out. As you complete each line, you would cross it off with a highlighter. You could probably do this also by moving a piece of masking tape up over each line as you finish it. Good luck. Sounds like a great one.


#279

The removable yellow note pads work very nicely for this. Cover the next line so only the current and previous lines show. You can also make notes on the yellow-note and it is always where you can see it.


#280

Not a nice sweater or bf?:shrug: