Crochet beginner ☹️


#1

Please could someone help me I am a beginner in crochet but already struggling!!! Could someone break this first part down for me please I know how to make foundation chain and crochet double knit however what does 4 dc in last chain mean? Help with all rounds 1-5 would be much appreciated Helpppp


#2

Hi! Here goes!
Round 1 you are skipping the first stitch, then do a double crochet in each of the stitches up to the last stitch where you will make 4 dc in the one stitch. Now you are going to work on the other side of the foundation. You arr going to proceed like you did on the other side of the foundation and work one dc in each chain until you get to the very last one where you will do 4 double crochets. At this point you should have 22 stitches
Round two: dv in each of the next seven stitches then in brackets it says to dc in the next stitch then in the next stitch make 2 dc, you are to repeat what is in the brackets twice. Then it tells you to repeat round 2 from the beginning once more. At this point you should have 26 stitches
Round 3: it is the same as round 2 except that in the brackets it tells you to dc in each of the next 2 stitches and then 2 dc in the next stitch, at the end you should have 30 stitches.
Round 4: this is also like the last 2 rounds excrept for the extra dc inside the brackets giving you a total of 34 stitchs
Round 5: you will dc in the back loops to the end. You again should have 34 stitches

I hope this helps you


#3

Thankyou so much for detailed instructions however what does it mean by do 4 dc? Is it 4 more chains to start the next row?


#4

It means to work 4 stitches (4 dc) in the last stitch which will give you an increase in stitches . Does that help?


#5

I understand it now. Thanks for your help. I’ve always knotted but want to learn crochet it’s just very difficult to follow
Many thanks


#6

You’re welcome! Amytime if i can help you just have to post your question


#7

Sorry just another question I have completed the 1st row and increased 4 at end of row however do I have to chain 3 more to begin second row or just continue to 1dc to end of second row?
Many thanks :pray:t2:


#8

Wait! Is the pattern from a book or magazine published in the UK?

Please check the source of your pattern.

The image on the pattern shows US Single Crochet stitches (the UK stitch names differ from US stitches, DC in the UK does not start with a yarn over before passing the hook through the next stitch to be worked and is equivalent to US sc.) https://www.thespruce.com/crochet-pattern-terms-british-american-english-978272

Please check the source of your pattern.

(Now on with answering your question)…

Just continue. The four DC in one stitch (increase) is just a way of rounding the end of this oval “DC sts racetrack” around the foundation chain.

This pattern is worked in a spiral. The next round will just start by working into the top of the first stitch of your previous round.


#9

4 DOUBLE CROCHET into ONE STITCH. Look- the pattern has you make nine chains, or “9 sc” sc being single crochets. So, you’ve got a chain with nine stitches on it. Don’t put a stitch into the first one, start on the second st (it would be physically impossible to put a st into the 1st one anyway, & fiddly to even place one in the 2nd as instructed) – then you just put a double crochet into EACH ST til the last one, which you stitch FOUR DOUBLE CROCHETS into that last stitch- giving you 22 sts! It went from 9 sts, up to 22. Those double crochets/DC’s gave you increases.

On a crochet forum yrs ago, someone wrote something that was a life-saver: "Don’t worry, there are no ‘crochet police’ to come arrest you for doing it wrong’ something to that effect. So, go ahead and learn your stitches, look at the pattern and count your stitches on each row- compare it to what the pattern says. Now, a caveat, sometimes patterns can be wrong! So, simple multiplication will sort it out.

Whenever I got confused, or mixed up in a pattern and was not sure where to turn, I would go ahead and do it as I thought it was supposed to go- knowing there were no “crochet police” over my shoulder, many times it came out alright, I just followed the instructions, not fussing over whether it “seemed right” or not.


#10

WhampusKitty; I really loved your explanation and advice that you gave. My younger sister is excellent at knitting. She followed a pattern for a camouflage sweater for her husband using a half dozen different shades of greens and browns. She carried the yarn in the back. When it came to the sleeves she took it upon herself to put her husbands name down each sleeve, without a pattern. Since I can’t knit, she really amazed me with her talent.
When I was teaching her how to crochet, she was so afraid of making a mistake that is was keeping her from having any enjoyment from it. I was afraid that she would quit out of frustration, so I told her that crochet is not as fussy as knitting and that a stitch that isn’t done exactly the way it is supposed to be done will rarely ever show. After our talk, she relaxed and learned to crochet with skill and enjoyed it.
I have been crocheting for more than 50 years and whenever I have found a mistake in a crocheted item, they have been so insignificant that, I feel I am one of the few who would ever notice. In most items a single odd-ball stitch will not stand out enough for the average person to notice it.
Now that she has learned to crochet, her work is as flawless and amazing as her knitting. She just needed to relax and not worry so much about perfection until she learned the basics.


#11

Thankyou very much :grinning:


#12

Wait! Is the pattern from a book or magazine published in the UK?

When they sad DC (UK) the equivalent is a SC (US)! That will change everything for you.

Clue 1) The blue croche image on the pattern shows SC stitches not DC stitches!
Clue 2) The pattern starts with cm and then parenthetically give inch equivalent

Please check the source of your pattern.

The image on the pattern shows US Single Crochet stitches (the UK stitch names differ from US stitches, DC in the UK does not start with a yarn over before passing the hook through the next stitch to be worked and is equivalent to US sc.) https://www.thespruce.com/crochet-pattern-terms-british-american-english-9782721

Please check the source of your pattern.

(Now on with answering your question)…

Just continue. The four [SC] in one stitch (increase) is just a way of “rounding” the end of this oval “[SC] sts racetrack” around the foundation chain.

Also this pattern is worked in a spiral. I mean there is no rising chain to the next round.
The next round will just start by working into the top of the first stitch of your previous round.

My translation:
make 9 ch.
Rnd 1: skip 1 ch and sc in second chain from hook, sc in next 7 ch sts, 4 sc in the last ch {note: this take you around the corner}. Working back the other side of foundation chain, sc in next 7 ch, 4 sc in last ch. (22 sts).
Rnd 2: * sc in each of next 7 sts, (1 sc in next sts, 2 sc in next st) {do the sts instructions between the parentheses} twice {note: rounding the starting end with tail} repeat from * once more. (26 sts)
Rnd 3: *sc in each of next 7 sts, (sc in each of next 2 sts, 2 sc in nex st) twice; rep from * once more. (30 sts)
etc


#13

Hi, I’m here recently, I also understand everything with difficulty. Thanks for the topic she helped


#14

So I have been trying to teach myself to crochet this weekend, Saturday the internet was out so I was using books.
I am a intermediate level knitter who has not knit much in the past few years and was trying to get back into it and up my game so to speak and the first project I pick had a bunch of ssk and moss stitch in and apparently there has been a developing change in ssk to do them better ? And the is it uk/ or us moss stitch.
So here I was relaxing in front of the wood stove making bits of things that look like a 6 year old made them ( chain uneven, dropped stitches, work getting ever skinnier)
And then I discovered the great us/uk debate continues in crochet.
So if single crochet is double in uk , what is double called.( and is there a single?)
I have one of those learn how books published by coats original cost .35 cents
I guess it is America , my eldest has my 1999 version at her place so I cannot compare the two.
I really just wanted to make some baskets!
I watched one YouTube video that had the hook go under only one piece of yarn in the chain stitch, but the books say under the top two pieces and then at first I was only going under one and pulling the hooked yarn through both at once and moving on , but rereads lead me to the under two catch and pull yarn through then catch and pull yarn through the new loop and the waiting on hook loop.
Argh!
I won’t work on a pattern until I am sure I am doing the right thing.
I always am amazed when folks say oh the first thing I knit was a sweater… so the first or second photo???


#15

There are some tweaks to the ssk that help it look more like a mirror image of k2tog. Admittedly, this is for yarn geeks.
https://yarnsub.com/articles/techniques/k2togl/

As far as moss stitch or double moss, I go with the pattern definition or the pattern photo but here’s a discussion.

@WhampusKitty and @OffJumpsJack will be able to help with your crochet question.


#16

I love Youtube. For crochet, check out Mikey at The Crochet Crowd, Jayda in Stitches, and Hectanooga1. For knitting, my favorites are Joannesweb, Bronislava, and Ruby Steadman.


#17

So I am well familiar with the crochet term differences from US to UK. This very thread has a previous post by me about it.
Alas, the link in it is bad. Here is a new site with the US & UK crochet terms.


US terms the prefix such as single or double indicates the number of loops or wraps on the hook before you go through the next stitch.

The answer to your question about how many loops in the stitch to go under depends on your preference or the pattern.

Each chain (stitch) of your foundation chain has three loops. The two on the top are front or back and then there is the single loop on the bottom.

Rolling the chain over to the bottom side and going under that single bottom loop is how you use a crochet chain for a provisional knitting cast on. If you do this to start your crochet pattern project it leaves the top two V shaped loops like a simple finished edge.

Read ahead in the pattern and see if the second or third row tells you to use “back loop only” this would indicate the pattern wants to leave a ridge on the front edge of the rows.

What is the name of the pattern?


#18

Thanks so much for all the advice!:hugs:
I wish I had learned to crochet from my step mom she was an Afghan master ( what we called bed size crochet blankets in the 70’s and 80’s) baby blankets too but alas they are all acrylic so not likely heirlooms.
@ offjumpsjack I found a list of uk/us terms in the back of one of my books,
It appear to be a British brand of yarn publishing for the North America market.
I mentioned this in a knitting thread I started but I am Canadian so it’s always a guessing game and and also I have a lot of vintage pattern- how too book and they seem to be even less consistent with Canadian ones favor uk terms.
I was not using a pattern at all simply trying to crochet a single crochet rectangle that was even.
All book in my possession have you go under the two top threads except for something called “single crochet rib” .
But the randomly chosen video clearly was under one with no mention of options so I was boggled.
I have used provisional cast on and done a lot of single and four finger knitting with kids so the chain stitch is second nature.
Have a great day