A whole new yarn

ok we all love to start a new ball of yarn at the beginning of a row, but what measure do you use? for me three and a half times the width of the cast on row. any ideas?

I’m not following you. When you start a new yarn at the beginning of the row, just leave 6" or so to weave in the tail and just start knitting with it. That’s all you need to measure. Unless you mean something else…

eta, and yeah, i just start a new end when I run out of the old one. And I use knots, and mostly knit in the round or seamlessly. But I don’t do color changes either.

I actually don’t like to change at the beginning of a round. :slight_smile: I remember reading in[U] Knitting Without Tears[/U] that Elizabeth Zimmermann said since she works in the round most of the time that she never thinks about changing at the beginning of a row. I think I thought if it was good enough for her it was good enough for me. :slight_smile: It is also a yarn saver and ‘tight’ is my middle name, so suits me well. I like to change in a place where I have some St st going if I can, and now that I’ve learned Russian join if I’m not doing St st but lace or something I’d use that.

So not an answer to your question, but something to think about.

Do you mean how to know if you have enough yarn for the row you’re about to start or should you start a new ball?

thank goodness grump’s on the same page as me … :aww:

That doesn’t frighten you, David? :shock: Mostly I don’t worry too much about it, I start the new yarn when the old runs out. I’m sure other people know more and can estimate better than I do. When I did worry about it, I would tie a slip knot in my yarn at about a yard from the needle, use a stitch marker to mark my starting stitch and then count how many stitches I had done when I got to the slip knot. From there I could estimate fairly closely how many yards it took for a row. You can use whatever unit of measure you’re comfortable with, I hold the needle near my nose and stretch my arm out to measure a yard. If I’m doing a stitch pattern I don’t want to risk running out of yarn, this is how I’ll do it.

Take a look at the Tips page for ways to join new yarn. I also don’t worry about running out of yarn in the middle of a row. Just join the new ball by whatever method you like and continue on. It makes for less bulky seams too.

I must be on the same page as David and GG 'cause I got what you were saying.

Here’s my method: Knit, knit, knit, knit, knit, (oh my, I’m almost out of yarn), knit, knit, knit, (will I make it to the end of the row?), knit, knit, knit (will I?), knit, knit, knit, knit, (I’m not going to make it–SIGH), knit, knit, knit, (well, I [I]might[/I] make it), knit, knit, knit, knit (Nope, not going to make it), knit, knit, knit (Maybe I won’t run out of yarn), knit, knit, (there’s [U]no way[/U] I can make this stretch to the end of the row), knit, knit, knit, (well maybe), knit, knit, knit, knit, (come on, Baby, just a few more), knit, knit, knit (Ahh! I DID have enough). Join new ball of yarn.

And that’s my tried-and-true method for figuring out whether I have enough yarn to finish a row!

I understood perfectly. Both the original question and Antares method for deciding if it’s enough. I use the same method unless it’s really really critical like a color change or something.

I don’t usually obsess over having to join at the beginning of a row/round. For one thing, I often find it easier [I]not[/I] to… but I’m a little strange (okay a lot). For another it drives me completely spare to waste yarn (a holdover from my childhood, no doubt, that no amount of therapy will ever cure). But if it’s critical, I usually figure on 3-4 times the length of the row. If it’s plain garter or stockinette, 3 is usually sufficient. If it’s a pattern stitch… it’s a little dicier. And if I’m trying to decide if I have enough for a BO, I err on the long side (at [I]least[/I] 4x) because all bets are off at that point, especially if I’m gonna be using the double-your-needle-size convention.

Dunno if that helps any, but it’s my 2% of a dollah.

I must say, I don’t like starting a new ball of yarn in the middle of a row as I’m not confident with the russian method of joining yarn. And, often, I’m working with hybrid commercial yarns that have polyester or synthetic blending with animal fibers and they don’t splice together very well for me.

And on the vexed question of wasted yarn? I have two cats who are ALWAYS in the mood for a new yarn toy … :heart:

Use knots. Seriously, I have been for years. They don’t move and they don’t come untied. My method is to loosely tie the ends together, work a couple rows then come back and move the knot so it’s on the purl bump on the WS, retie it. Then I also weave in the ends to anchor it in place. Can’t be seen on the RS.

Use knots

I wasn’t a boy scout and never learned to tie knots securely…on purpose, I can get all kinds of hard to undo knots in my yarn when I’m trying to avoid them. What knot do you use? I know how to tie a square knot. Would that work?

I’ve used this knot in scarves. Although I know a lot of knitters think putting knots in is a knitting sin. I only just learned what “weaving in the ends” actually does. I never thought that doing that would be secure.

I don’t worry about using the Russian Join (which is handy, since I’ve never learned it). I just drop the old strand and start with the new one. It’s a little loose for the first stitch – maybe two – but everything’ll get fastened down fine on the next row/round (sometimes it takes a little extra “convincing” on that row when you get to where the last/first stitches are, but you just have to be firm with it.) Once the ends are woven in it’s not coming apart, which is the goal here. If it’s especially “slick” yarn, I might go so far as tying a square knot in it to hold it together. That can be taken out later – or not if I determine that its not going to matter.

That said, if I’m working in a pattern that’s very “open” and I don’t think I can hide the woven ends very well, I’ll get a bit more concerned about where I stop/join. Or if there’s a color change involved – stripes or some such. Then you obviously have to start at the beginning.

Worst case is that I run out in the middle and have to back up to the start of the row. NOBODY likes to do this, but it’s not exactly the End Times if you have to.

I have the same problem. I always feel like knotting cottons and acrylic/nylon blends in order to get a decent join. I think joins in the middle of a row are often noticeable anyway, even with wool and the Russian method. There is often a slight thickness or stiffness there. Well, at least there is on my sweaters. :blush:

Also, I love this topic. :teehee: I never gauge correctly whether or not I have enough left for a row. I always think I have so much yarn left, but I read somewhere that you need at least four times the length of your row for st st. That’s a lot!

Usually I knit a couple stitches w/both yarns and then weave in ends. Using mostly synthetic yarns I can’t use the ones like the Russian join at least I don’t think so.

I don’t worry about using the Russian Join (which is handy, since I’ve never learned it). I just drop the old strand and start with the new one. It’s a little loose for the first stitch – maybe two – but everything’ll get fastened down fine on the next row/round (sometimes it takes a little extra “convincing” on that row when you get to where the last/first stitches are, but you just have to be firm with it.) Once the ends are woven in it’s not coming apart, which is the goal here. If it’s especially “slick” yarn, I might go so far as tying a square knot in it to hold it together. That can be taken out later – or not if I determine that its not going to matter.

That said, if I’m working in a pattern that’s very “open” and I don’t think I can hide the woven ends very well, I’ll get a bit more concerned about where I stop/join. Or if there’s a color change involved – stripes or some such. Then you obviously have to start at the beginning.

Worst case is that I run out in the middle and have to back up to the start of the row. NOBODY likes to do this, but it’s not exactly the End Times if you have to.

Worst case is that I run out in the middle and have to back up to the start of the row. NOBODY likes to do this, but it’s not exactly the End Times if you have to.

Wake up, mojo, smell the java. End times is the very problem under discussion. Your name says it all today, mo(re)jo(e). :roflhard:

I was a girl scout and we learned knots. The only one I can do though is the square knot and that’s what I use.