Why do my stitches look like this?

Absolute beginner question here. I am on my 5th knitting project, a hat for my toddler.

I am trying a very simple pattern that only requires knitting one row then purling the next. I noticed something funny about my stitches. For each row, one “leg” of the stitch is longer than the other. On the next row, it’s the other way around.

First I tried changing how I pull the thread through. I realized I was pulling the yarn backwards on the purled rows but doing it correctly didn’t seem to fix the one leg longer problem but it did fix the problem of the yarn going sort of flat where each ply was coming undone on the needle. My purled rows also still seem a tiny bit looser (taller?) than the knit rows. I’m using Lion brand wool ease in a worsted weight.

I never noticed it before because I used yarns with lots of fuzz. The last thing I made with the “normal” yarn was an illusion knit scarf so there was a big variation in the knit/purl rows so I never could tell.

Is this a case of having to sit down with someone who knows what they’re doing so they can tell me what I’m doing wrong? The good thing is that everything’s very neat and consistent on each row so something is working kinda. :slight_smile:

the last time i tried to explain how i purled people gave me the :?? look but let me try again.

When i first started I purled by bringing the working yarn behind and over the right hand needle. It made knitting into the stitch on the row back difficult but i just thought that was how it was.

I saw someone say that the purl stitch should be just as easy as the knit and went to watch amy’s video on purling. That was when i noticed she wraps her work from the front to the back of the right hand needle. Essentially i was twisting my stitches.

as soon as I stopped doing that, the longer leg went away.

hopefully that makes sense. Watch Amy’s purling video and see if you are doing it the same direction she does. (Btw…i knit continental if that matters!)

Thanks. I thought I had seen that video already, but I guess I only saw her do knit and I must have tried to just reverse it in my head. Obviously that was wrong! I had the yarn in a wrong place and pulled incorrectly, too.

Time to practice! Thanks for your help. :smiley:

I was Purling wrong for MONTHS
now its so much easier

ecb

I don’t believe it. I’ve been doing it the wrong way for years and years. :shock:
It’s no wonder my FOs were never quite as nice as I’d hoped - half the stitches were twisted. :wall:
Oh well… you live and learn. :thumbsup:

I’m so relieved to find that I’m not the only one who found out she’s been purling wrong for years. :lol:

Well, it isn’t a problem really. It just means that the shrug I’m starting for myself tomorrow will be much better than the one I finished for my MIL today. :lol:

A quick note about the difference between purl and knit… quite often your purl stitches will be looser than knit, which may make them looser/ taller.

That doesn’t sound like a problem to me at all!!! {Although my MIL would never receive a knitted shrug from me… she’d be lucky to get a crocheted dishcloth from me – that’s a 30 min. FO for me!!!}.

I’m getting this. I am still getting one long leg on both so it looks like a herringbone pattern when I knit even though I am doing it “right”. So now I think it’s just a matter of practicing. I hope!

I don’t think it is a problem, I think you are right, it just comes with practise. It probably just means that your stitches aren’t all of equal tension.

I finally figured out how to fix it: I switched to working in thrown method instead of continental.

I think it has to do with a consistent angle for the needles and consistent direction that the yarn is pulled through. I do still have to work on tension because it seems a tiny bit tight, but it seems easier to keep it all consistent this way.

Working the ribbing would probably be a lot harder though, and since it probably isn’t noticable anyway, I’d probably switch to continental if I had to do a tiny rib.

Unfortunately, it’s a little harder on the elbows.

OT: I bough some nice yarn at $15/ball and I had three of them. I think my hubby threw them out by accident during a cleaning frenzy. cry

I finally figured out how to fix it: I switched to working in thrown method instead of continental.

I think it has to do with a consistent angle for the needles and consistent direction that the yarn is pulled through. I do still have to work on tension because it seems a tiny bit tight, but it seems easier to keep it all consistent this way.

Working the ribbing would probably be a lot harder though, and since it probably isn’t noticable anyway, I’d probably switch to continental if I had to do a tiny rib.

Unfortunately, it’s a little harder on the elbows.

OT: I bough some nice yarn at $15/ball and I had three of them. I think my hubby threw them out by accident during a cleaning frenzy. cry

:shock: I’m so sorry! I hope it turns up again!

Thanks brendajos,

Your description helped me too! :cheering: