What type of stitch is this called?

Hi,

I need help identifying this stitch so I can find it on youtube, what I did find doesn’t look like what the pattern describes. I’ve practised on a test piece and it decreased 1 every time I did the stitch. Its for a 1940s Balaclava (open face type), I’m on the last stage for around the face part.

(the 1st round: 1st needle: rib to last 2 sts, k2tog, 2nd needle: rib. 3rd needle: k2tog through backs, rib to end)
what I’m stuck on, and I don’t want to risk till I’m sure I know what I’m doing:
2nd Round: As 1st round, but twist each ‘‘knit’’ rib as follows: Insert needle through first stitch purlwise, then draw the 2nd stitch through the first stitch knitwise, knit it and slip off needle, then knit the 1st stitch

Am I basically pulling the the stitches through the other, then knitting each of them? I think I get it, does it have a name? I’m not sure where I’m supposed to do it as the 1st round.

I want to say you’re right, but I’m not that experienced to be truly sure. Also I don’t believe that stitch had a name, you’re basically twisting the knit portion of the ribbing…I think.

@salmonmac

Yes, I agree, pull the 2nd stitch through the first, knit it then knit the first stitch. I don’t know the name either, it’s a way of doing a mini cable or left twisted stitch.
For the second round, work the decreases as given in round one but twist the knit rib.

Interesting…

I believe I have some baby items knit by my DW’s g grandma that use this stitch extensively! At first glance I had thought it was a simple mini two stitch twisted cable (which I guess it actually is) but then I realized it didn’t look quite the same as what I had seen before bc one stitch seemed to be drawn thru, not over the other on the twist. I’d have to examine again to be totally certain but I think it is the same.

I wonder if this was a st pattern that was in vogue mid-20th-century-ish or something perhaps? (unfortunately g grandma is no longer around to ask.)

I believe it’s called a cross stitch. It’s similar to this video. I did it on a project once before except I think I knitted it from the front. https://youtu.be/zz4i-SostPs

I would suggest using a bind off around the face like Jenny’s surprisingly stretchy bind off and a knitted cast on. This will make it easier to wear and get over your head.

You can also put stitches on waste yarn to pick up later, like for peasant thumbs and afterthought heels.

Only just read your replies. That method would have been better opposed to the 1940’s instructions ‘cast off loosely in rib’. Its still a little tight around the hole but not a major problem, no problems getting it on. It also seems to be adjustable, so I can pull it over my nose. Earlier I made a 3-ply one (as instructed) and this one in double knit. ideal for very cold days especially camping. Not sure I’ll be wearing it to town or the bank for example :thinking:


40_40

Right of pic: matching mittens from the same war time booklet. They would be donated to the RAF, knitted in Khaki, navy blue or Air Force blue. The change of colour, was were I changed to the next ball of wool, I didn’t realise it had a colour pattern to it, but the stripe is were I would have chosen it to be.

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Nice job! That’s a great pattern!

Well done! We’re in a couple of days of deep freeze so your balaclava and mitts look particularly appealing. (Yes, banks definitely a no-go.)

Great pattern, excellent work, are you willing to share a link to the pattern or it’s name. I like that it is worked in Rib throughout and it looks like it has a nice long neck.

@Beeltejuice
Yes, it would be of interest to have a pattern name and link if possible.

We arent allowed to share patterns are we? Its a small booklet called ‘Sitchcraft - Mens Book’ priced 8d. Heres a picture of the front cover as there is more than one stitchcrafft booklet that was made. They often come up on ebay, but is quite rare.