Trying to read a pattern

New to this and trying to decipher what this means:

[COLOR=“SeaGreen”][B]First and next 8 foll alt rows: P.[/B]
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Inc row: (Inc) to end (24 sts).

Inc row: (K3, inc) to end (30 sts).

Inc row: (K4, inc) to end (36 sts).

Inc row: (K5, inc) to end (42 sts).

Inc row: (K6, inc) to end (48 sts).

Inc row: (K7, inc) to end (54 sts).

Inc row: (K8, inc) to end (60 sts).

Inc row: (K9, inc) to end (66 sts).

Inc row: (K10, inc) to end (72 sts).

Beg with a p row, work in St st for 15 rows.

thanks!

Welcome to KnittingHelp!
Purl the next row and then purl every other row. The knit rows will be the increase rows given in the pattern. You’ll end this set of directions with the last increase row, ready to begin the stockinette section with a purl row.
Can you give us a link to the pattern or a pattern name?

http://www.womansday.com/home/crafts-projects/how-to/a5353/craft-project-knitted-toy-elephant-112798/

Very cute little elephant. It looks like similar directions come up in a couple of places. It means to purl every other row for the given number of rows.

Thanks, that’s what I thought it meant. Just a matter of learning the lingo.

Dec row: (K7, k2tog) to end (64 sts).

Next row: P50, turn.

Next row: S1k, k35, turn.

Next row: S1p, p to end.

Dec row: (K6, k2tog) to end (56 sts).

Next row: P44, turn.

Next row: S1k, k31, turn.

Next row: S1p, p to end.

Dec row: (K5, k2tog) to end (48 sts).

Next row: P38, turn.

Next row: S1k, k27, turn.

Next row: S1p, p to end.

Dec row: (K4, k2tog) to end (40 sts).

Next row: P32, turn.

Next row: S1k, k23, turn.

Next row: S1p, p to end.

Dec row: (K3, k2tog) to end (32 sts).

Next row: P.

Next 2 rows: K.

Dec row: K2tog, k to last 2 sts, k2tog tbl.

Rep last 4 rows 4 more times (22 sts).

Next row: P.

Next 3 rows: K.

Rep last 4 rows 8 more times.

P 1 row.

Dec row: K2, (k2tog) 4 times, k2, (k2tog) 4 times, k2 (14 sts).

Cast off p-wise

These are short rows which are done to create shape. Just turn your work as you would at the end of the row. Don’t worry about the stitches remaining on the left needle. You’ll get to them later.
Many times short rows are worked with a wrap&turn or some method like German short rows to avoid a hole but your pattern doesn’t seem to indicate that. If you don’t like the small holes left from the turn, look up a short row method. I like German short rows but there are several others.