The continuing sock

Morning all…

Well I am past the heel part of the sock and working the gussett, My questions for today are this:
The K2get 2 and ssK… I understand are decrease stitches I understand this… but are they done this way for the angle of the project?

Also what is the purpose of a sl stitch… at the beginning of a row. or in a pattern? Sometimes this stitch is so very large.

My next question is this:
WHen I had to do the side stitches for the sock, along the heel flap it said to pick up 19 and knit them. I for the life of me could not get my brain and hands to manage this process. I watched a few videos and they just picked up stitches, but want to understand just how to pick them up and then knit them… I am stumped.

I only started knitting again to make a pair os socks for my daughter and have put this aside so many times in the past months that I have made scaves, hats, wrist warms etc to avoid the sock… even started a tank top. Good thing is I managed to force my self to learn continential knitting, cause it seems more manageable for the ribbing stitch. Now it is so easy to do… both the stitch and the ribbing I always seemed to mess up.

So in all the rambling I will Master the sock…

Cheri

The K2get 2 and ssK… I understand are decrease stitches I understand this… but are they done this way for the angle of the project?
You are right about that, it for the angle at each side of the gusset.

Also what is the purpose of a sl stitch… at the beginning of a row. or in a pattern? Sometimes this stitch is so very large.
There can be different reasons, overall, for a slip stitch in a pattern. At the beginning of a row they can be to create a “neater” (some like them others don’t) edge. I think on the sock they are supposed to make it easier to pick up the stitches. Sometimes they are part of a decrease.

along the heel flap it said to pick up 19 and knit them. I for the life of me could not get my brain and hands to manage this process. I watched a few videos and they just picked up stitches, but want to understand just how to pick them up and then knit them…
Most of the time when a pattern says to pick up and knit, it is the same thing as what you saw on the video you watched of someone picking up stitches (I’ll bet. There are other ways of picking up stitches, but not as common.). What you are doing is sticking the needle in and getting ahold of it and pulling a loop onto the needle. It is actually knitting a stitch up onto the needle, so it is called pick up and knit.

Yep, just like Merigold has described. Videos really help. Cause you can see it in action.

Oh thanks so much that makes sense to me now…

Now the final thing on this thread… when I am picking up the stitches… some come out good enough to pick up… and then some seemed more a yarn over when coming back around to knit the next row… any advise on this part? I did manage to get the stitches to work… but have some little gaps bigger than I would like on that round? May need a tac after I am done… or pull out… shall see after this response

Once again… thanks for all your assistance
CHeri

I was wondering what could make one of the “picked up” stitches to look like a yarn over on the next row, so I tried some things and here is what I found. If I stick the needle through, but don’t actually pull up a loop onto the needle and then go on to the next spot and stick the needle in and pull up a loop, I get exactly what you said. In fact, it would basically be a yarn over in that place where I didn’t pull up a loop. You might want to take it out and try again. Be sure to pull up a loop each time you insert the right hand needle.

If you hold the heel between you thumb & forefinger & look straight down on the edge, you will have what looks like a crochet chain stitch. Or a daisy petal. Bring the needle into the gap/opening under both strands of the petal working from the right side. That way you catch your new stitch under both loops. It is more sturdy. You need to make 1 stitch per opening. Otherwise you have gaps in the finished sock. If you have missed stitches, take it out & start over. This is somewhere you have to fix it.

There is a way to knit socks on 2 straight needles with no seams but it means that you will have to knit the underpart of the sock first from ankle to toe and then work your way up on the top part from toes to ankle and knit them together as you go and even then the knit in seam will be noticeable . To work socks this way you will also need to know how to dissemble a sock knitting pattern so that you can get the correct amount of stitches to get the shapings right

When you are working the gusset, it’s important to make sure you make no decreases on your instep needle (the one with the most stitches on it. If you are looking at your instep needle (assuming that you are working the standard 3 DPN configuration) when you go to your needle No. 3 you knit one stitch, slip one stitch on to the right needle, knit one and pass the slipped stitch over the stitch you just knitted. Now, when you look at the way the decrease “leans” you see it starts to form the “triangle” of the gusset with the instep. On Needle No. 1 you will knit to the last 3 stitches and knit 2 together and knit one. You will notice that the decrease there leans in the opposite direction of the KSKPSSO method.

At first it’s difficult to understand, especially if you have not really taken note of the way certain stitches lean or hang once they are done (and to be honest, you really have to knit two rows beyond that one stitch to get a good look at the lean of the stitches.) If you are unclear and just not getting it and having to frog a bit, I highly recommend making little practice projects, until you understand exactly what it is you are doing. I did this for a long time when learning socks, watching a ton of videos and just doing it over and over and over until I felt I “got” the concept of the pattern.

To give you a good idea on how your stitches “lean” I recommend doing the border for the Tree of Life Baby Afghan. YOu can do a couple of them and truly understand which increase and decrease methods get the look the pattern is asking for. This on little project is the BEST method I’ve found for learning increases and decreases to form a pattern you can see and understand.

I wish you luck. Socks are a great stress reliever for me. And everyone can use socks, so they are always received gladly.