Monstrous, beautiful project: the story so far …


#1

Several regulars to the Forums are familiar with this project via my frequent bleats for help; but I’ve decided that it warrants a bit of a blog, as it’s going to be, like, looooong …
(1) Weekend before last I began to knit this pattern.
As I live on the age pension, I couldn’t possibly afford the divine stuff to make it with that the pattern calls for; so I went to Bendigo Woollen Mills and found a 10 ply aran pure merino and opted for that (‘blue denim’). The difference in cost was [I]indescribable[/I], that’s all I’m going to say. :shifty:
I commenced.
(Having tried several times with what this site calls ‘long-tail CO’ and found myself with the working end of the wool at the [I]other [/I]end, I’d given up and just cast on as usual. Fortunately, I’m a loose-ish knitter, so that wasn’t a problem. I have only now ascertained via the Forum precisely how to do the CO the pattern recommends …)
Several days later I found, to my rage and frustration, that the two ‘shirt-tails’ with which one starts off the project were, at the point of their joining, twisted. :expressionless:
I spent quite a long time pulling out what I’d done and winding it into a nice neat ball again (BWM balls are the equivalent of 4, and I’d almost reached the end of the first one), before …
I re-commenced.
Somewhere along the line I went reluctantly to eBay and purchased a tally counter, having conducted another thread in the Forum on this topic. It is A Success Story, and I reckon circular knitting is made tolerable with its use.
I’m now up to something like row 66, and it’s becoming quite heavy and unmanageable; but that was always going to happen. When your’e a large old broad, your garments will always be difficult to deal with in terms of pushing stitches around: at the moment there are 240 on the 100mm needle!
I’ve also received help regarding the changing to a new ball within a continuous garment, again via the Forum.
I shall continue to post as I progress, in the hope that this thus-far unending saga might be of use to anyone undertaking a similar kind of project …


#2

I attempted to edit that post in order to insert a couple of images, but found myself quite unable to do so. Is it me???
Anyway, here they are: the first is what it looks like so far; and the second shows the herringbone pattern.
You can see that there’s going to have to be some very good ironing done, at finishing – if I live long enough.
:???:


#3

That is beautiful. No wonder you’re so determined to get it under control. It’s well worth it and you’ll enjoy wearing it. I love your won’t quit attitude and determination to subdue this monstrous, beautiful project most of all. Hang in there!


#4

Love the stitch pattern! It’s going to be fun watching you beat it into submission :yay:


#5

Perhaps a neat and tidy list of the input I sought (and received, and how!) in order to undertake this project might be practical …
Below is the help I’ve received – so far! – through a couple of topics within the Forum:

(1) I went to ‘Pattern Central’ regarding switching the wools.
(2a) In ‘How-to Questions’ I found out about long-tail casting on;
(2b) Myself informed regarding keeping row count with circular needles;
(2c) Was confirmed in my horrible suspicions of what to do when one gets one’s continuous garment twisted;
(2d) Found out about starting a new ball.
(3) Viewed an external video regarding the best way to use markers. It turned out to be IMPORTANT - as did the choice of the kind of stitch marker chosen!

When I put it down like that, I am APPALLED!: you’d think I’d never knitted anything in my life!
:shock:


#6

Are things so different now? Having only started 8 yrs ago I don’t know the old ways if they are indeed different.


#7

Hmm … your question has a certain … ahh … zen quality, Jan. It reminds me of a line from one of my favourite movies, ‘High Road to China’: [I]The oxen are slow, but the earth is patient[/I]. (I’ve had a pash on Tom Selleck since laying eyes on him in ‘Magnum PI’ - and that’s a while back.)
<grin>
But in fact I reckon you’re asking if my need to ascertain all those things arose from their being [I]new [/I]things, yes? If so, then the answer is, I believe, no: they ain’t new wrinkles – I’m just showing my ignorance.


#8

I really don’t look for answers anymore…I try to figure out what the question is. Once I know the question getting the answer is much simpler. I think part of what you’ve encountered might be differences in terminology and so the questions and answers don’t always sync. Maybe not.


#9

I can certainly understand if the terminology is at issue. We do have members from all over the world and it’s sometimes hard to help. That’s one of the reasons we always ask for links. You’ve do e very well asking for help and I hope we’ve helped you some!


#10

And GG’s point is at the heart of just about everything, as I get old … Knowing what the question actually is, when set about by any kind of confusion or uncertainty – working that out and then putting it clearly is what makes one able to manage.
Personally, I’m bloody hopeless at it: my husband was so good at … [I]everything[/I], the darling!, that I never really had to do anything at all. When I wrote about him I said, entirely truthfully, of our 31 years that I was able to stump him on an enquiry less times than there are fingers on one of my hands. So you will understand that being now without him, I have had a lifetime of stuff to learn. And GG has put her finger on the best way of doing that.
I congratulate you, you horrible old thing! :notworthy:
And Jan, if you haven’t worked out from my posts heretofore (or however you spell it) that I’m full of praise and gratitude, you never will. :slight_smile:


#11

Okay, I know we’ve helped you. :hug: You’re very sweet and funny and we are glad to have you with us!


#12

I appreciate your sense of humor, Marg1e, and your outlook. You know you can do it, you just have to muddle through the figuring out. I’m the same way about lots of things. The biggest difference between you and me I think is that you had someone to rely on. I had 3 kids…and divorced the oldest. I didn’t want to be mommy to an adult sized male. I’m glad you’re here, I feel we learn best when we learn together. I’m learning from your experience too. We do need our Aussies! :muah:


#13

:blush:
:present:
:slight_smile:
I go back to the other end of the flat, now, to continue attacking the beautiful monster.
More later …


#14

I’ve just remembered a whinge I forgot to make! - and it’s one that’s with me all the time.
During all the pushing and shoving of those 250-odd (now) stitches around the circular needle, I have also to stop to remove dozens of marmalade tabby cat hairs!
And not just the ones that can be clearly seen because of contrasting well against the dark blue of the wool, but also the much finer ones from his under-fur, the little bastard …
Look at him! - who the devil spoiled him like that?
Why is there cat’s fur all over this flat, integrated into everything within it?
Sighh … they say we cat-lovers make rods for our own backs: well, I must add that we cat-loving knitters are far, far worse!


#15

Ohhhh! I love your ginger kitty! I miss my sweet kitty so much even the kitty fur. Maybe you should learn to spin it! :teehee:


#16

Oooohhhh, the big baby! Look at the name with the knitting videos in this link.


#17

Maybe I should! :-
Like the lady who knits with the stuff: she seems to’ve learned how to, eh?
Wonder if that’s kosher?
Whaddya reckon, team?


#18

My cat was a Ragdoll breed and her undercoat was good for spinning. I didn’t knit till she was older so no time to collect that fur. If its good for spinning why not? After all we spin with other animal fibers. Goat, yak, bison, camel, sheep, alpaca, llama…

This was my kitty, Marshmallow.


#19

I have Kosher Dill pickles in the fridge.


#20

Cat fur should be kosher, lobster shells aren’t, so no knitting when pet lobster sheds.

I do see part of your cat’s problem, though. He seems to be upside down. Must be a Northern Hemisphere cat. (Our much-loved and not-long-lived-enough orange dude Fred used to sleep meatloafed, but upside down. I still miss you, furry orange!..and yes, I have been owned by a houseful of rescue cats since then because of him.)