Making First Sock - Inside Out?

Question for you…

I’ve been working on my first sock (as many of you probably already know). I finished the ribbing at the top and have completed three pattern repeats (rows 1-4 in the pattern – baby cable rib).

I noticed that the cable rib is on the inside of the tube. Is this going to be okay later?

I thought about turning the sock inside out (or right-side out), but I’m concerned that if I do that, the pattern will continue to be knitted on the inside. Do you follow?

Did I do something wrong?? :shrug:

Thanks for your help.

When you hold your needles in a ‘round’, you need to be holding them so that the two needles you are working with at any given time are held closest to you. I’ll use the example again which was given by Ingrid, I believe, of a drinking glass. When you take a drink from a glass you drink from the edge closest to you. Same with knitting in the round – if you knit with the needles that are furthest from you, you will wind up knitting on the inside of the tube.

Hmmm…I’m not sure exactly what you mean. I’ve knitted in the round using a circular needle, and the stitches were on the inside too.

I’m knitting my sock with four dpns (stitches on three and fourth is the empty one).

/
__

/=needle #1
__=needle #2
=needle #3

When I use the fourth needle to start stitching, I’m knitting from needle #1 (working yarn is coming off of needle #3.

I just turned my sock (what there is of it, anyway) inside out, and I think I see what you are saying.

But, my sock is now going to come out toward my tummy. Is this right??

I feel really stupid (and slow)…this sounds like such a dumb question!!!

Thanks for being patient!!!

The way I see your diagram, the needle you have numbered #2 is closest to your body as you hold the needles, right?? So holding them that way, when you start knitting stitches off of needle #1 you will be making your stitch pattern on the inside of the ‘triangle’ of needles. When you hold them, they should be situated something like this:
__
\ /

\ = needle 1
__ = needle 2
/ = needle 3

Then when you go to knit stitches off of needle #1, your stitch pattern will be on the outside of your tube.

My friend does this too. Basically it means that rather than drinking from the edge of the glass closest to you (great anology) you are drinking from the edge opposite.

I am not sure its really a huge problem - you can just turn it right side out when complete.

Will it matter when I start to do the heel or toes?

How can I prevent this from happening when I cast on for sock #2?

Here are pictures of what I’ve done.

  1. Push the sock down so it’s inside right. (Is that a real phrase?)

  2. Make sure you knit from the two needles CLOSEST to you. There should be no tube between you and the stitches you are knitting.

The tube will point DOWN toward your stomach instead of coming out the top.

It’s this way for any knitting in the round – always knit with the needles facing you and the tube coming out the bottom.

Good luck.

Thanks Bill, but I if I push the tube down, then the right side is inside.

I guess, basically, I need to know if this will affect the rest of my sock. Will it matter when I get to the toes and have to graft them together? When I’m done, I’ll have to turn the sock rightside out.

Also, if I leave the sock rightside in, then I have to knit with the two needles at the back. It’s really weird, but that’s the way, somehow, things got set up.

I’m still trying to figure out how I did it. :??

If there’s a hard way to do something, that’s the way I manage to do things. :teehee:

Now I’m confused - you say that when the pattern right side / the outside is, well, outside, and you knit from the needles closest to you (like the edge of a glass that you drink from), the sock comes out the top of your needles? The usual way is to do it as I describe, right side out and working on needles closest to you, and you get the tube coming down toward your tummy.
However, whatever way you’re doing it, the sock will still be the same. I have sometimes found that the part of the sock hanging down gets in the way and have seriously considered pushing it ‘inside-out’ to fix that. I don’t think you’ll have problems in the construction of the sock, you’re knitting it the same way, it is just sitting differently. Hey, this way, you can do a three-needle cast-off instead of grafting if you want, and won’t even have to turn it inside out!
If you’re bothered by this, though, just push the tube through the needles so it is right-side out, and knit normally (on the needles closest to you), you should get it right this way. There will be some tutorials on the net
http://www.az.com/~andrade/knit/circular.html
scroll to the bottom of the page for that one, or watch the KH video on knitting on DPNs.
Sarah

Now I’m confused - you say that when the pattern right side / the outside is, well, outside, and you knit from the needles closest to you (like the edge of a glass that you drink from), the sock comes out the top of your needles? The usual way is to do it as I describe, right side out and working on needles closest to you, and you get the tube coming down toward your tummy.
However, whatever way you’re doing it, the sock will still be the same. I have sometimes found that the part of the sock hanging down gets in the way and have seriously considered pushing it ‘inside-out’ to fix that. I don’t think you’ll have problems in the construction of the sock, you’re knitting it the same way, it is just sitting differently. Hey, this way, you can do a three-needle cast-off instead of grafting if you want, and won’t even have to turn it inside out!
If you’re bothered by this, though, just push the tube through the needles so it is right-side out, and knit normally (on the needles closest to you), you should get it right this way. There will be some tutorials on the net
http://www.az.com/~andrade/knit/circular.html
scroll to the bottom of the page for that one, or watch the KH video on knitting on DPNs.
Sarah

This is one of those situations where words are inadequate – someone sitting next to you could show you in a few seconds. It’s a little frustrating, isn’t it? A lot of people go through exactly what you’re doing right now – it’s very common for knitting in the round, along with twisting your stitches. If you have a local yarn shop, you could probably drop in there and they would be able to tell you right away how to orient things properly.

Let’s see if this makes sense to you: in picture A, you had the right side out. Put the sock like that. Move your working needle (the one the next stitch would go to) to your left hand, keeping the right side facing you. The other two needles should form a “v” pointing away from you. Take the empty needle in your right hand and start knitting. As you proceed, the tube will grow down.

But if it still doesn’t make sense, you can keep knitting inside out till you get to your grafting. At that point, if you turn the sock inside out (or actually, right side in), you can proceed to graft like normal. (Actually, I’m not sure how turning a heel will go in this inside-out way. My head hurts just thinking about it!)

Let’s see if this makes sense to you: in picture A, you had the right side out. Put the sock like that. Move your working needle (the one the next stitch would go to) to your left hand, keeping the right side facing you. The other two needles should form a “v” pointing away from you. Take the empty needle in your right hand and start knitting. As you proceed, the tube will grow down.

Actually, when I put the needles that way, the working end of the yarn is the last stitch on the right side of the needle, so I have to rotate the needle so I can work off of it. As I said, I have no idea how this happened. It’s very strange, but not abnormal for me. :wall:

I’ve decided to just knit it RS out, with the sock coming towards me. When I finish this one, I’ll make sure I take my time casting on and setting up sock #2.

Y’all are the bomb!! :muah: