Loose loop at the end of row

In a previous post I asked about dropping or slipping a stitch at the end of a row. It’s hard to describe what I’m talking about but here goes: I am actually getting better with my knitting now and I just did a good row, but after I finish a row, there is a large loose loop at the end that needs something and I don’t know what. Before I start the next row, what do I do with that loop? I thought it had something to do with dropping or stitching?

Thank you for your help,
Pauline

Dropping and slipping stitches are very different things…if you are slipping a stitch I have always heard of slipping a stitch at the beginning of a row - can’t say as though I have ever slipped a stitch at the end of the row.

Are you following a pattern that has you slipping the last stitch of the row? If you’re doing it to prevent the edge from curling I would try slipping the first stitch of the row.

good luck

Whether you work or slip the first stitch in a row, snugging up the 2nd and 3rd stitches will help keep them tight and tidy. It gets easier. Snugging up the next stitch or 2 is helpful in many instances and becomes something of a habit.

In most cases I think that’s pretty normal and after a few rows it just works itself in. That’s what happens to me. If it stays loose perhaps you are pulling it a little too much and stretching the yarn?

If you are working on something that will be seamed those edges will be hidden.

Example attached.

Oh I see, it’s the loop at the cast on? What cast on are you using?

My suggestion is keep knitting for a few inches so you can see if loops work there way in and if it’s only the cast on. Some cast on styles are better than others.

I think it’s called casting on with one needle.
http://www.theknittingsite.com/cast-on1/

This is the only one I’ve learned.

Thanks.

You’ll see references to long tail cast on. That’s the same thing. It’s possible to start without a slip knot and I think that helps avoid a loose loop at the end.


You know how hard it is to change something you’re used to but I’ll give it a try. If not, I’ll just hide the loop!
Thanks

I do long tail without a slip knot all the time. It’s actually quicker and easier. Just remember that the first cast on stitch creates two stitches. You’ll see what I mean when you try it. Those two stitches count and you knit each one separately.

If you find it too difficult and want to use a slip knot make sure to make the loop snug up to the needle. That should help with the loose stitch, too.

I tried the cast-on with out a slip knot and it works fine. Are you saying I won’t have the large loop at the end if I do it this way?

Tonight I tried to perfect the slip stitch at the end and I found that I need more practice with that. In the video, I get confused about what to do with the yarn after the slip-stitch.

I started working on my purse and after about 10 inches, I’ve decided my edges look so rough, I think I’ll have to start over. :wall: I have to decide which way to do it this time to get good edges.

Thanks, everybody.
Pauline

Will your purse be seamed? Seaming hides less than lovely edges quite nicely. If they aren’t seamed you might finish them with a single crochet edge. I’ve done that.

I agree, if it’s the purse you linked to previously, the edges will become part of the seam anyway.
http://www.lionbrand.com/patterns/kwet-purse.html?noImages=0
Go ahead if you’d like and finish the purse and maybe you can practice edges on a swatch or a scarf?

Yes, the sides will be seamed together. The whole thing is about 18 inches long, then folded into. The top seam looks good. So maybe I’ll keep going another 6 inches… :star:

I was looking for a good and easy way to edge and I like the one in this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_odMnlGeH-o
I like the yellow swatch. Looks pretty easy. Got to practice!

Thanks!