Knitting 4 stitches together

I’m sure this is the easiest thing in the world, but for some reason I cannot seem to knit 4 stitches together. I am working with a bulky yarn and I am wondering if the problem is that the points on my aluminum needles seem a little dull (they are a little old) or if there is some trick to doing this.

I am going to try to cast on a little more loose and see if that helps. But does anyone else find this to be a tricky thing to do that just takes patience and manuevering.

I am knittng the waverly from Berroco.

Thx

I think it is a pretty hideous stitch really. anything over two is enough to send me over the edge. if you have really thick yarn and dull-ish tips that will only make it worse. i don’t really know of a way to make it easier either. the best i could ever do was to grab the bottom of the stitches when i got to them and give them a little tug hoping to give more room. it helps some but as far as i know there really is no easy way to do it. :shrug:

I don’t know about anyone else, but I have the same trouble. I tend to knit a little on the tight-side and have to make a point to loosen up my grip. I have more trouble knitting multiple stitches together on the first row after the cast on, then it seems to be easier. I know No trick other than take a deep breath and exert some major patience.

You can try using a crochet hook in a slightly smaller size or you could try slipping 2 sts as if to purl, k2tog then pass the slipped stitches over.

It seems Ingrid had an easy way of doing a bunch of kXtog, but I can’t recall if it was like above or what. Perhaps she’ll chime in.

ETA: I just found my note from some website on P or K tog large amts:

[INDENT]"…PXtog/kXtog bobbles or nupps can be done more easily as psso’s and you’ll get a result identical to actually trying to knit or purl them together .

To purl X together: Slip X-1 stitches purlwise. P1. Pass the X-1 stitches over. Snug the yarn in case executing the stitch left slack in the work. (e.g., for p5tog, slip 4 sts purlwise, p1, pass the 4 sts over)

To knit X together: K1. Put this stitch back on the LH needle. Pass X minus 1 stitches over the knitted stitch, i.e., take the second stitch on the left needle and pass it from left to right over the knitted stitch, slipping it off the end of the needle. Repeat.
Return the finished stitch to the RH needle. Snug the yarn in case executing the stitch left slack in the work. (e.g., for k5tog: k1, return this stitch to the LH needle, pass 4 sts over, return the finished stitch to the RH needle)

This method produces a very neat, reliable bobble/nupp."[/INDENT]

Beat me to it!:thumbsup:

:happydance: I’m a busy girl today on the computer (but mainly busy trying to stay in the A/C!) - I’m doing a sewing project for a friend and I [I]really[/I] don’t like the material - need a break about every [SIZE=“1”][FONT=“Garamond”]five minutes[/FONT][/SIZE] half hour or so!

I usually take those kind of breaks when I’m cleaning.:lol:

Cleaning? I’m not familiar with that term? My husband tells people my hand doesn’t fit the vacuum cleaner. I noticed my hand has a problem getting the dryer door open, too, as well as the hose for watering outside. Conveniently, my hands [I]do[/I] fit all sizes of knitting/crochet needles/hooks.

:rofling:

I’ll have to try that one!

I just found the other method I had discovered to make an easy k or pXtog. [I]Way[/I] too many Tips and Tricks in my Tips and Tricks file!

This would only work with circs or interchangeables with the stoppers on:

Slide the stitches to be knit together to the left-hand cable part of the needle. Then slip the right-hand needle into all those stitches and knit them together; then slide the left-hand needle out.

krazy4kats,

This is a new thing for me. I love learning new tricks like this. I find I can knit 4 tog pretty easily because I knit pretty loose, but if I ever get asked to do some X of stitches that I can’t do I’ll have this trick to save the day. If I remember it. LOL I’m putting it in my little personal book of “Knitting Hints”. Thanks Merigold