Intarsia Question

I am currently doing a pattern that requires a color switch. I wish I could show you the pattern, but it’s copyrighted, of course. Anyway, it’s a dog bed done in blocks and in the middle of the block is a dog face. The pattern says to do the MC in k and the CC in p and the opposite on the next row, etc., but when I was doing it last night, the CC was showing on the WR instead of the RS. Is any of this making sense? Anyway, when I watched the intarsia video on this website, Amy did either k or p all the way across the row, just incorporating the CC. Do you think my pattern could be wrong? If not, I’m assuming just going ahead and doing either k or p all the way across the row would be fine.

Thanks!!!

Stacy

It make sense, but I don’t know how to correct it. The only intarsia I’ve done has been in one stitch. When I’ve done a combination of stitches to form a pattern the stitches were all the same color. :think:

OMG!!! I think I just had a revelation. I was sitting here at work trying to picture what I had done and I think I know where I went wrong. When I started my CC color, it started as a p stitch and instead of starting the yarn from the back and bringing it forward, I started it from the front!!! That’s why all my “carry overs” and my pattern was showing on the opposite side of my MC. I can’t wait to get home and start over!!!

Stacy

I don’t quite understand what you mean, or if this is of any help, but you should be able to change from k to p. When you twist your mc and cc, just bring the cc on through between your needles to the front of your work. When going from purl to knit, just take the yarn to the back between the needles and then twist.

Most intarsia is done in stocking stitch, is it possible that they meant something like keep the contrast colour in back/on the purl side when they said keep it in purl (rather than the CC being in reverse stocking stitch)?

Sarah

If you go from st st to reverse st st with a color change, you’ll end up with two colors showing on the first row. You could knit the first row of the color change on the right side and then switch to purl after that for a smoother color transition.

Yes, Sarah. I believe that is what they meant. I tried it again last night and did it that way and it worked out quite nicely! I guess it just took the time to step back and really think about it to get it going!! So far it’s looking real good and I can’t wait to finish my first square!

Stacy

First time ever I did two color knitting was yesterday. I am doing a practice swatch just to be sure I understand it correctly. It looks okay after only 10 practice rows. As I understand it right now, the color you want to use has to come from beneath of other color. In your case, the main color should be knit from beneath the contrasting color. Pls someone let me know if this is wrong as I want to be able to understand this before jumping head first into the hat pattern.

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That’s exactly what you need to do. If you hold the yarn that you’re stopping over to the left and then bring the other strand up, you will get that effect automatically.

First time ever I did two color knitting was yesterday. I am doing a practice swatch just to be sure I understand it correctly. It looks okay after only 10 practice rows. As I understand it right now, the color you want to use has to come from beneath of other color. In your case, the main color should be knit from beneath the contrasting color. Pls someone let me know if this is wrong as I want to be able to understand this before jumping head first into the hat pattern.

First time ever I did two color knitting was yesterday. I am doing a practice swatch just to be sure I understand it correctly. It looks okay after only 10 practice rows. As I understand it right now, the color you want to use has to come from beneath of other color. In your case, the main color should be knit from beneath the contrasting color. Pls someone let me know if this is wrong as I want to be able to understand this before jumping head first into the hat pattern.