I'm stuck on a shawl collar

Hi, I’d appreciate some help. I have successfully completed the back, front-left, front-right and 2 sleeves of a basic cardigan. The pattern includes a shawl collar and I’m completely stuck. The instructions are as follows:
CO 212. Work 1 row in k1, p1 ribbing
Cont. in k1, p1rib. At each edge, dec 1 st every row 2 times, then BO 4sts 9 times and 5 sts 10 times. At same time, when piece measures 3" from beg change to middle size needles and at 6" change to smallest needles. BO rem 36 sts.
I’ve knitted it twice now and I just can’t get from 212 stitches to 36 stitches.

Thanks, Linda

You start with 212 and you end with 36sts so it’s a decrease of 176sts. the decreases total 88sts on [I]each[/I] edge or 176sts total.
(2 + 36 + 50 =88, times 2 is 176sts)

Okay. I get that.Thanks But how do I bind off at the end of a row rather than at the beginning? Don’t I end up with the yarn in the wrong place.

Cont. in k1, p1rib. At each edge, dec 1 st every row 2 times, then BO 4sts 9 times and 5 sts 10 times. At same time, when piece measures 3" from beg change to middle size needles and at 6" change to smallest needles. BO rem 36 sts.

You do the decreases at [B]each[/B] end 2 times then you do the bind offs only at the beginning of the rows over the next 9 rows (4 at the beginning of each row) then bind off 5 at the beginning of the next 10 rows. You’re right you don’t want to bind off at the end of the rows or the yarn gets messed up. When the piece is 3" long go to the second size needles and at 6" to the littlest ones. When you have 36 sts bind them all off.

You’re right, you don’t usually bind off at the end of the row. Bind off at the beginning of the next row. It’ll take 18 rows to bind off 4sts 9 times on each side (and 20 rows for the next bind off). Use your row gauge to calculate how many inches this gives you and see if that depth of collar is what you would like. There is a way to bind off at the end of the row but I’ve never done it where there were so many sequential decreases before because it’s a bit tight.