How long of a strip of garter stitch knitting can I make that's 20 sts wide with 1 skein of #4 yarn on 8 needles?

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The blanket idea looks lovely. If you Knit two second stripes at a time, then you can do a seamless color change. Second part is knitting only a portion of the second color width and starting the next “stripe” with the second half of the second color stripe. You can also use a standing seam to create the ridges.

I just wanted to get the AI* out of the way.

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I’ve been trying to understand what you’re saying here and now admit defeat. If you’re working rows of 20 sts why would circulars be easier? You can do join as you go knitting using any needles as long as they hold the number of stitches you’re using. I sometimes use dpn to add an applied border which is worked in the same way, and I sometimes use circular needles. i think you want strips of 20 sts which are joined along the ends of rows as is shown in the video. I grabbed a screenshot of the sort of thing I think you’re wanting. If you want flat joins then mattress stitch might be your best option for joining the strips. Because of the photo I thought you liked the ridges. I could have this all wrong which is why I italicized think.

Knitting strips

FWIW my preference in needles is circular because they’re leashed and it’s harder for the furniture to eat them when I drop one. I don’t often use dpn and if I still have any straight needles I don’t know where they are.

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Hi! I’m sorry I was so confusing. You are exactly right about everything, except that the picture was never meant to have ridges in it. It is not a photograph, but an image made with and AI image generator. I gave it a prompt like, ‘Knitted blanked on bed with long stripes,’ or something, and it came up with this. The reason I used the picture was simply to illustrate the direction I wanted the stripes to face, and approximately how wide they should be.

I had already started to knit a 20 st wide piece, and I was hoping I could keep it and make it work somehow. But, as someone else pointed out, making all the stripes individually would be a lot of seaming to do, not to mention tedious, trying to make sure the number of rows is the same for each one. Seams are not one of my strong points. In fact, i just finished sewing up a sweater that was otherwise completed two months ago. :slight_smile: Although I really like the look of the join-as-you-go method you showed me, I think with my limited level of experience I would progress faster if I simply started over using a circular needle with a couple hundred stitches, or however many are necessary to get the length i want for the blanket, and change the yarn every so many rows to make the stripes. I hope this helps clear things up, and I want to thank you for all the time and effort you have put in to helping me figure this out.

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Thanks for clarifying. Yes, for that many stitches you’ll need a circular needle.

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If you make a swatch first, maybe 30 sts wide and roughly a square, you can use it to work out your gauge and how many stitches to cast in for the long edge - so that the stripes go in the direction you want and so the blanket is as long as you want it.

As you work the earlier rows you can begin to get a feel for how many meters a full row takes (you can even outline out and mark a certain number of meters before you start a row and then look at how much you used when you finish the row), this way you will get more idea of whether to go for one more row before a ball runs out or if you should switch colour before starting the row. Obviously it also depends if you want every band to have the same number of rows or to vary.

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I just have one question. If i want the blanket to be 78 inches (198 cm) long, what size of circular needle do I need? I’ve been trying to figure it out, but it’s kind-of confusing.

I just have one question. If i want the blanket to be 78 inches (198 cm) long with about 312 sts, what size of circular needle do I need? I’ve been trying to figure it out, but it’s kind-of confusing.
edit: Never mind, I figured it out. :slight_smile:

See if this chart helps. You can disregard the minimun number of sts since you aren’t knitting in the round. The chart takes into account the gauge which for 312sts in 78inches would be 4sts/inch. The number for 5sts/inch is close enough to give you an idea.

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I’ve figured out the easiest way for you to make the blanket you want: An all garter-stitch blanket with vertical stripes, that is 78" long and approximately 60" wide (you said you wanted it about 312 stitches wide, but didn’t say the width you wanted in inches). That’s the same size as the very first blanket I made, and I kept notes, so I was able to do some math to figure out how much yarn you would need. The design I am proposing would not require ANY sewing!
The blanket I made was 79" long and 60" wide when finished (~ the same size as the top of a queen size bed). It was 303 stitches wide, and 486 rows long. I also used #4 worsted weight yarn, but I used #7 needles. So the calculations will be slightly off with #8 needles. Using #8 needles will make it larger. And garter stitch is a little wider than the (stockinette) stitch I used, so that will make it a little wider as well. I calculated that my blanket would use 11 skeins of the yarn that you are using (380 yds each). Using larger needles uses more yarn, so I would approximate that you need at least 12 skeins of yarn to complete your blanket. And I would suggest you use the largest circular needle you can find – 47" is the size I always use for blankets.
So I would suggest you buy 12 different skeins of yarn in the colors you want for the stripes. And then buy 1 more skein to make a horizontal border on the top & bottom edges of the blanket. The borders will make your top & bottom edges neater, and make it easier to add in all the colors for the stripes without any wonky-ness! The borders will also make it WAY easier to cast-on and bind-off in just ONE color, instead of 12 different colors. The color for the borders could be a neutral color - like black, white, or grey - or whatever color you like.
You can knit the whole blanket at once, on your one set of circular needles. The trick is to use the “Intarsia method” of knitting to join your stripes together as you are knitting. Intarsia is usually considered a rather difficult method of knitting, but for this situation, it is NOT difficult at all. You just need to do an Intarsia Join when you come to each new stripe. To do an Intarsia Join you take your OLD yarn (the one you just finished using) and place it OVER your NEW yarn (the one you will use next), and to the left. That’s it! Here is a video: Intarsia Joins by ACTechniques
So here’s the “pattern” for the blanket:

  • Cast on 300 stitches using your border color. Knit 20 rows. Cut your yarn, leaving a tail to weave in.
  • Start Row 21 with the color of your first stripe, and knit 25 stitches. Leave skein attached to your work.
  • Then ADD IN your NEXT color of yarn, and knit 25 stitches. Leave skein attached.
  • Repeat this until all 12 colors have been added in. You will be leaving all 12 skeins of yarn attached to your work.
  • For Row 22 (and all remaining rows), knit the 25 stitches of your first color. Then put OLD over NEW, and knit 25 stitches of the next color. Repeat for all 12 colors.
  • Knit until desired length, or you run out of yarn. (I did the calculations so you will have enough to make it the length you want – 78")
  • Then make your end border with the border color and knit 20 rows. Then bind off & weave in ends (you will only have 28 ends!)

Some other tips:

  • If you are completely unfamiliar with intarsia, there are lots of videos about it – but most of them will be more complicated than you need for this particular blanket.
  • If you keep your skeins of yarn lined up in order, you will not have too much tangling of yarns.
  • Here is a video to make beautiful edges on a garter stitch blanket: How to Knit Beautiful Edges by Knitted Ideas
  • You should make a small practice swatch with scrap yarn and STRAIGHT needles to get the hang of these techniques, and work out any problems you might have before you start your real blanket. I’d suggest casting on 40 stitches for your end-border (you can make the border any length you want, as long as it is an EVEN number of rows - I’d suggest 10 rows) , and then making 4 stripes - each 10 stitches wide. Knit as many rows as you’d like until you get the hang of it. Then finish up with the other end-border. This practice swatch will not only help you understand the process better, but it will perfect your technique and also allow you to use it for making size calculations for your final blanket.

If you have any questions, or need help, I’m happy to answer. This would be a very beautiful and UNIQUE blanket! Most people won’t knit a blanket like this – they would usually knit it sideways, but that is too many stitches for me to scrunch onto one needle! And the stitches would come out sideways. :roll_eyes: Simply using the Intarsia Join allows you to knit the whole blanket in the normal fashion - from top to bottom! Best of luck to you! :grinning:

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That’s a conundrum! I can’t believe I actually found a chart for this! https://impeccableknits.wordpress.com/2010/01/02/circular-needles-how-many-stitches-will-they-hold/

Beth

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Thanks! I was originally thinking of doing the blanket that way. I have used that method before, but I used multiple stripes of each color, and it was just way too complicated. I looked through my yarn and decided to have the blanket be dark red, red, orange, yellow, green, light blue, and dark blue, with cream colored stripes in between. But rather than have them all in chunks, I thought it would look nice to have them in multiple, narrower stripes. So it would be complicated to try to divide out the yarn evenly into balls for each small stripe. Also, I want to work on this on a roadtrip, and it would be easier to just use one color at a time. Thank you so much for the info about how much yarn to use, though. That is super helpful. :slight_smile:

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Hi! Thanks for the help everyone. My circular needle just came in the mail, and i’m going to start the blanket. I watched this video for how to do garter stitch selvedges. I really liked the first one, the wrap–around garter selvedge, and and I was wondering if anyone could recommend me a cast on and bind off that would match the style. I want to start today, and if anyone could help, I would be so grateful!

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What a fun project!
You might consider a provisional cast on so that you can match the cast on and bind off edges. That way you can take out the provisional at the end of the project and work the same bind off on both ends.
One possibility is the Icelandic bind off. It’s the first one shown here.

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I like the Icelandic bind off too, it looks lovely next to garter stitch. There is also a matching cast on. Both take a little practise in tension I my experience and I remember changing my needle size to make them too.
I think a provisional cast on I a great idea as it gives you time to think about what edge you want.

I would suggest a swatch with the garter stitch selvedge to see how the colour change rows turn out as you’ll need to decide exactly at what point to introduce the colour change or how to wrap the old colour around (to weave in the end) and then change to the new colour. With the first stitch unworked does it jog the colour change?

Did you want to avoid adding a border across the top and bottom?

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I tried the Icelandic bind off, and It looks great. I heard that the german twisted cast on also can be paired with it. I tried to do the Icelandic cast on, but I couldn’t get the tensions to match. Also, the german one is a lot easier, and I have 316 stitches to do. I’ve never heard of a provisional cast on, but I should check it out. Would you just do icelandic bind off on both sides?
For the color change, the lady in the video suggested introducing the yarn at the last stitch, before beginning the next row and slipping the stitch. You’re right though, I should try it first. Yes, I think I would like to go without a border. I would like to have the colors go all the way to the edge.

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German twisted cast on is lovely. Since it’s a long tail cast on, you might try working it with two sources of yarn so that you don’t run out of the “long tail.”
A provisional cast on can be worked a couple of ways but I prefer using a knitting needle and crochet hook at the same time.

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Yes, I have used a provisional cast on so that I can bind off with icelandic and go back to the cast on edge and bind that off with icelandic too, so the two edhes are the same. I did this before I knew about the matching cast on but as you have seen there is a tension difference and you probably need to change the needle size on a swatch to work it out.
Probably a good idea to practise the provisional cast on too if you haven’t used in before.

Thanks!

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