Help with kitchner

i AM TYRING TO FIND OUT HOW TO KITCHNER IN RIB STITCH

What are you Kitchner-ing? The toe of a sock? A side seam?

i AM JOINING TWO SIDES OF A SCARF. iT HAS BEADING AT EACH END THEREFORE YOU KNIT EACH HALF THEN JOIN

I’ve been thinking about this and, frankly, am a bit stumped. I’ve only ever done kitchner in a stockinette stitch. My “go to” book of answers only explained kitchner in reference to stockinette. This question makes me curious and I’ll keep looking.

Okay, I’ve googled this topic. The first two may help. But the flickr address may help the most. Keep in mind though that the host, in the notes, says the chart is read from left to right and bottom to top, but it’s really [U]right to left[/U], bottom to top. I think that one may help you the most.

http://www.software4knitting.com/knitting/kitchbo.htm
http://www.knitsimplemag.com/node/68

Hi Hatz,

I have been working on this problem most of the morning. I found the first site Sunshine’s Mom found and that might be helpful if you are working in the round, otherwise I don’t know. The other 2 left me scratching my head. :?? :lol:

I looked this up in my Vogue Knitting book. They give instructions for grafting (kitchener stitching) in K1, P1 ribbing. I have been trying to do it and am beginning to get a degree of success.

The Vogue Knitting and the 2nd site given by SM both say to do regular kitchener by taking a few stitches off the needles at a time. I have never done it that way. I do it with all the stitches on the needles and follow Elizabeth Zimmermann’s instructions in Knitting Without Tears. That has always worked for me for all my needs. But the way the Vogue Knitting is very different on the rib kitchener.

You might try to get one of these books at a library and see what it says on pages 102 and 103. First of all it says to use 4 dpns or 4 circular needles to do this. Working with one side of the piece (and then the other afterward), slip all of the knit stitches to one dpn and all the purl stitches to another dpn. So each side of the piece now has two needles holding its stitches.

Then you butt the two ends together as you want them to end up and graft all the knit stitches from one side and all the knit stitches from the other side (one side at a time). There will be two more needles with stitches you are not using laying underneath where you are working. It says to take a few stitches off at a time and graft them “as shown”. In the picture all of the stitches are just laying there off the two needles, for the stitches you are working on. The other set of stitches are on two dpns under where you are working.

I wondered if after I got the stitches divided up the way they said that I could just kitchener stitch each side as I would normal stockinette stitch. I tried it and it joined it together all right, but it is not a perfect join. There is a line of stuff going across the join that shouldn’t be there. So I think you can’t do it the normal way. :sad:

So I tried to do it “as shown” just going from the picture of where the yarn was going. :eyes: I wobbled a bit especially at first, but I began to get it and it looked really good (where I did it right). What you are doing is taking the loops from each side and “knitting” a new stitch between the pieces built on those loops. You have to follow the course of where the yarn would go to do this. It was a little tricky but I started getting it. I wondered if I could figure out some instructions for accomplishing the same thing without taking the stitches off the needles, and maybe I could (maybe not), but I have other things to do today. :lol: Maybe the only way to do it is with the stitches off the needles, but I doubt that.

After you have grafted the knit stitches from the two needles on one side, you turn it over to the other two dpns that are holding the other stitches. Since you turned it over, you are now looking at them as all knit stitches too and you join them the same way you did the first side. Easy peasy! Just kidding. :chair:

If you are working with K1, P1 ribbing and doing it flat, I would try to get the Vogue Knitting book and give it a look. :shock: With some practice their idea will work. The knitting in the round kitchener bind off for the sock might work if you are doing in the round. The other two???:?? I would think there is something about this on the net, but I didn’t come up with much that looked reasonable to me. But that could just be me.

Good luck. :out:

This is an interesting one isn’t it? I do think the flickr site should help. In fact, I wrote that info down and plan on putting it in with my knitting stuff just in case I ever need it. The chart is a bit complicated but makes sense if you study it and read it in the same manner that you would graft.

I think I would put the sides to be stitched together back onto straight needles. Now you have the rib stitches lined up ready to be grafted.

This is an example with 18 stitches front and back, just like the chart, for K2P2 ribbing.

Begin to graft as you would normally: Purl into the 1st front stitch, Knit into the first back stitch.

Then - working from front two stitches to back two stitches as normal:

K slip P (Front)
P slip K (Back)
K slip K (Front)
P slip P (Back)
P slip K (Front)
K slip P (Back)
P slip P (Front)
K slip K (Back)
K slip P (Front)
P slip K (Back)
K slip K (Front)
P slip P (Back)
P slip K (Front)
K slip P (Back)
P slip P (Front)
K slip K (Back)
K slip P (Front)
P slip K (Back)
K slip K (Front)
P slip P (Back)
P slip K (Front)
K slip P (Back)
P slip P (Front)
K slip K (Back)
K slip P (Front)
P slip K (Back)
K slip K (Front)
P slip P (Back)
P slip K (Front)
K slip P (Back)
P slip P (Front)
K slip K (Back)
K slip P (Front)
P slip K (Back)
K slip front stitch P slip back stitch - tie off.

There is a method to it. Maybe looking at the chart will make more sense now.

This has actually been fun to figure out and I cant wait to try it. Thanks for the brain tease!!!