Help finding a fingering weight thread in UK

Im looking for a fingering weight thread similar to this (http://www.knitpicks.com/Gloss_YD5420151.html) that is available in the UK.

I only know tw ouk yarn websites, laughing hens, and angel yarns, and they don’t sort the yarn by weight. and i still have trouble comparing gauges. Can anybody recomend a similar yarn which knits to the same gauge as the gloss, or how i can figure out if a yarn is the right weight without buying and actually knitting up a swatch (could get costly if i don’t get it right first time!)

Thank you

Have you tried e-bay? I have seen alot of fingering weight on ebay and most sellers will ship to UK.

I have bought alot of yarn from this seller

She is very fast and reliable.

Maybe this can help you: the yarn you saw in knitpicks knits at 7-8 sts for inch ,so you should look for something similar, like [COLOR=Red]here[COLOR=Black], it’s from a huge store called [/COLOR][/COLOR]www.getknitted.com[COLOR=Red][COLOR=Black] and you also can check out [/COLOR][/COLOR]http://www.kangaroo.uk.com/
HTH :hug:

I was going to say Get Knitted too!

Hi Amanda

So glad you’re an accurate typist, telling someone to get knitted can have it’s downside!:rofling:

Lamey

Many sock yarns can be knit as fingering weight, and you can also look for 3 or 4-ply.

http://www.cnyttanpatterns.co.uk/erol.html lists yarns by weight.

Some to look at:
http://www.angelyarns.com/patons/inca.php
http://www.englishyarns.co.uk/acatalog/Products_Rowan_4_Ply_Soft_13.html
http://www.hipknits.co.uk/shop.php?crn=237 (fingering weight option)
http://www.woollyworkshop.co.uk/acatalog/Shetland_4ply__NEW_YARN_.html
http://www.woollyworkshop.co.uk/acatalog/Glitter_Alpaca.html
http://www.wool4less.co.uk/DEBBIE-BLISS-BABY-CASHMERINO_AAHO3.aspx
http://www.wool4less.co.uk/SIRDAR-COUNTRY-STYLE-4-PLY_AALLA.aspx

A lot of “baby” yarns knit as fingering, but they’re generally pretty limited in palette to soft pastels.

Jackie

If your system is the same as NZ, you probably want 4-ply. But label gauge is probably your best guide.