gauge


#1

I find that whenever I get the right gauge in stockinet (or any stitch?), I am way short on the number of rows I’m supposed to get. Example: for my current project, I’m supposed to get 3 3/4 st per inch and 5 1/4 rows per inch. I’ve got the stitches right but only 4 rows rather than the 5 1/4 I’m supposed to get. Why and what do I do?


#2

It depends on the pattern you’re following. In most cases row gauge is not as important as stitch gauge because patterns will tell you to work for so many inches rather than rows. If the item is fitted, like a hat or sweater and is knit side to side, row gauge becomes more important. The same is true for raglan shoulders on sweaters.

Because most patterns have you knit for a given length, you don’t have to do anything about an errant row gauge. If it’s a raglan, you may need to change the frequency of inc or dec at the seam.

What pattern are you following? Can you give us the name or a link?


#3

It’s just a tiny baby cap, so I think I’ll just go with it. But I recently knit a sweater the directions for which were all given in number of rows to knit, and I went nuts trying to make it work. I finally gave up and just adjusted for the number of rows. The sweater came out well, but it’s not a very closely fitted piece. When I ran into this issue with this project, I thought I would check it out with other knitters to see if there is something I’m missing or doing wrong. thanks for the help.


#4

This is common. If necessary I think most people do exactly as you did, convert rows to a length measurement using the given row gauge.
Enjoy working the cap!


#5

I’ve run into some that called for a certain number of rows, not inches, and you sure do need to be careful with them. It may be a matter of yarn substitution. Just because two yarns are #2, for instance, it doesn’t mean they’re perfectly interchangeable.