Garter stitch turned stockinette

Hi again,
I’m knitting this cardigan pattern: http://nikkivandecar.com/2016/06/24/maile/

And somehow my garter border turned stockinette on the right side of the border. I will include pictures. I’m not opposed to leaving the few mistakes as is because it is a small part that isn’t too noticeable, but I’d like to get back into the garter pattern. How is the simplist way I should go about that? TIA!

What part of the sweater are you working on?

This is the bottom of the sweater. I feel silly asking probably an easy question, but I must have purled when I should have knitted to mess up the garter

Hi! That was my assumption too. :wink:

The knitting looks very nice and even. You can fix this mistake or call it part of the design, it’s up to you.
You can correct this fairly easily for all but the very edge stitch. Here’s a video that may help:
https://www.google.com/#q=laddering+down+to+repair+garter+stitch&kpvalbx=1&spf=1499446729039
The very edge stitch won’t matter so much and since it’s a bit more painful to fix, I’d leave it as is.

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It’s possible to undo the garter border turned stockinette portion and reknit the border. It can be tricky getting the tension right and seeing which strand of yarn to use at first. Begin reknitting at the inside of the border and work to the end. Turn the work and using the next strand of yarn reknit the other side. Repeat as many times as needed.

Starting at the inside edge of the border you’ll be using the bottom strand of the yarn that loops at the end to start the next row. It took me awhile to figure out the positioning of the yarn for working the first stitch but once you see how the yarn travels it really isn’t hard. It looks like the number of rows of border to fix aren’t all that many. You might want to try it.

When the mistake is close to the edge, I would drop the furthest stitch from the selvage and unravel it down to where it can be fixed. I use then a crochet hook of about the same diameter as the knitting needle, then work the stitch up from the bottom, using knits and purls as appropriate. Then do the next stitch towards the selvage, and so on.

If you were working the stitches instead of slipping the first stitch, then you can leave the selvage stitch alone. It will go into a seam, but, if you think it shows, you can work that down the same as the other stitches. But it is more fiddly than the rest.

There are also double-ended crochet hooks which can be used to work up a variety of knit or purl stitches. Then you don’t have to pull the crochet hook out to change from knit to purl, you just pull this clever tool through. I have a set of four from Clover but really the ends are carved too sharply to do it with them, they are more double-ended Tunisian hooks which are shorter. The better tool is made of metal and the hook end is more rounded. I’ve seen them online but never at Joann, my local store.

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I would do it this way too as it’s only a couple of rows down. I wouldn’t fix the edge (selvedge edge) as I don’t think it would be noticed there. There are only four stitches to drop (one at a time). Good luck.

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