Felting

I’ve read up a little bit on it…and I think that I should be able to do it without screwing it all up (but only time will tell!). For Christmas I’m planning on making some slippers for my daughter and nieces. I’ve found this pattern that I’d like to “play” with:

http://www.knittingatknoon.com/slipperpatt.html

I’m a pretty fast learner and am alright at reading patterns…

Here are my questions:

What would be the best yarn to use for this project…like, what brand would you suggest and what price range am I looking at to make three pairs of slippers?

I’ve never used wool before, is it hard to work with?

These slippers will be for a toddler, and two young children…is there a certain yarn that would work better where the size will be smaller?

With the wool be itchy?

These are all probably very petty questions, but I know next to nothing about working with wool…care to help???

Hooray for you for learning how to felt!

I love felting – the projects usually knit up quickly and it’s so much fun to see the results come out of the washer.

As for what kind of wool to use – there is so much available and a very wide price range but you don’t have to spend a lot of money on wool that you are going to felt.

KnitPicks offers their Wool of the Andes for $1.99 a skein. Two skeins would be plenty for one pair of slippers.

Plymouth Galway sells for about $6 and one skein would be enough for a pair of slippers. It felts nicely.

Cascade 220 is about $6 to $8 depending on where you are buying it and also felts well.

You can also go fancy and use something like Malabrigo or Manos del Uraguay which will cost about $12 a skein but the Malabrigo will make a pair of slippers out of one skein and the Manos will take 2.

As for softness, the Malabrigo wins hands down.

I have never had a problem with itchiness of something after I felted it – I think the washing and the agitation help with that. Most felted wool comes out pretty smooth.

It doesn’t matter the size of the garment, just choose the wool you like and then decide if you are making a lighter weight slipper or heavier (in that case you would be using 2 strands of the yarn at once and you’d have to get twice as much yarn if you do.)

Hope this helps!

Susan

Thanks SOOOO much for your reply! You’ve been very informative and you have no idea how much I appreciate it! :smiley: With the [U]Wool Of Andes[/U], would I really have enough for a pair of slippers if I just bought two skeins for each pair!? Even for sizes a bit larger (like for children ages 3 and 4)?? That’s insane! I just checked it out, picked out three different colors that I LOVE and they could be shipped to me for less than $15…that’s crazy!!! I’m gonna talk it over with Hubby, and hopefully we’ll be getting some in the mail sometime soon!!! Sorry for all the silly questions and thanks SO much for all the help! I’m bound to ask many more questions along the way…I’m hoping that you’ll be there to help me a bit…you seem to really know what you’re talking about! :smiley: Thanks again!!

The pattern says that for an adult size 9 slipper, you would need about 280 yards of single strand all together. The Wool of the Andes is about 110 yards per ball so I think 2 skeins will be more than enough. You may even get a pair out of one but I would get 2 to be on the safe side.

Don’t worry about asking “silly” questions – even experienced knitters have questions from time to time.

Best,
Susan

Alas, another reply… :stuck_out_tongue:

For needles for this particular pattern, is says:

[B][U]Needles - US size 11 (8mm), 16" circular (optional for adult slippers) and 4 double-point needles, or size needed to obtain gauge.[/U][/B]

I don’t really understand what it means when it says “or size needed to obtain gauge.” or whether or not the 16" circular needles are also a US size 11.

I’ve been knitting for 12 years, but I’ve only ever followed a pattern a few times before, so please bear with me!

I’ll be making the toddler slippers first (those will hopefully be worn by my daughter…) and I can’t seem to make sense of what it’s saying…with work as youth, work as adult…I go back and read the adult and youth and I get really confused. I’m so sorry…I wish that I was great at this kind of thing so I wouldn’t be such a bother… :confused:

The pattern also mentions:

[FONT=Comic Sans MS][COLOR=#000080][B][U]Worsted weight wool for felting; choose a light worsted for double stranding.[/U][/B][/COLOR][/FONT]
[B][U][FONT=Comic Sans MS][/FONT][/U][/B]
[COLOR=black]Would the Wool Of Andes be thick enough to not have to do double stranding, or would I have to buy double the yarn and do the double stranding? [/COLOR]

Again, I’m so sorry for this…I wish that I could just understand it all…you all make it look so easy…:verysad:
[FONT=Comic Sans MS][/FONT]
[FONT=Comic Sans MS][/FONT]

[quote=myjoyoverflows;966279]

Alas, another reply… :stuck_out_tongue:

For needles for this particular pattern, is says:

[B][U]Needles - US size 11 (8mm), 16" circular (optional for adult slippers) and 4 double-point needles, or size needed to obtain gauge.[/U][/B]

I don’t really understand what it means when it says “or size needed to obtain gauge.” or whether or not the 16" circular needles are also a US size 11.

this means, a circular needle that is 16 inches from tip to tip, and size 11. also a set of double pointed needles in a size 11.

to get gauge means to get the same number of stitches over 4 inches as set in the pattern. if you do a test swatch (knit a 4-6 inch square in the pattern) then count the number of stitches over 4 inches that’s your gauge. too many stitches? then you need a bigger needle. too few? you need smaller ones.

I’ll be making the toddler slippers first (those will hopefully be worn by my daughter…) and I can’t seem to make sense of what it’s saying…with work as youth, work as adult…I go back and read the adult and youth and I get really confused. I’m so sorry…I wish that I was great at this kind of thing so I wouldn’t be such a bother… :confused:

patterns frequently have combined instructions for all the sizes. like it will say cast on 88 (102, 110, 140) and the first number is for the smallest size, the ones in parentheses are for the larger sizes.

when I’m getting ready to do a new pattern, I find it helpful to write out just one set of instructions for the size I am making. or highlight just the numbers of stitches for the size you are doing. (like yellow highliter for the small size, orange for the medium and green for the large) that way you can quickly find the right instructions.

The pattern also mentions:

[FONT=Comic Sans MS][COLOR=#000080][B][U]Worsted weight wool for felting; choose a light worsted for double stranding.[/U][/B][/COLOR][/FONT]

[COLOR=black]Would the Wool Of Andes be thick enough to not have to do double stranding, or would I have to buy double the yarn and do the double stranding? [/COLOR]

WOTA is a worsted weight, so I dont think you have to double it for this pattern unless you want a super thick finished product.

(someone correct me if I am wrong!!)

Again, I’m so sorry for this…I wish that I could just understand it all…you all make it look so easy…:verysad:

no one was born knowing how to knit- everyone has questions!!! please don’t apologize!!! people here are the BEST and everyone is so nice, and there is bound to be SOMEONE who can answer just about every question out there.
MKZ

I love to felt, too. I’ve found that Paton’s Merino Wool is good and not so expensive. HOWEVER, I know there are wools that may felt better, just haven’t tried them… I have tried cheaper/thinner wools and have decided that they are just that- cheaper and thinner and will leave holes after felting… something to do with the spinning, I imagine. And I agree with the test swatch… it will also let you know how long to leave in the machine. Generally, items shrink at least or more than half in rows and only shrink about 1/3 to 1/2 on the stitches. The larger the needles, the more the item will shrink. So 11-13 are great. If you want to maintain any stitch pattern detail, use smaller needles or double strand 100% wool with an acrylic, polyester, nylon, cotton or the novelty yarns(which are usually made from manmade fibers). Another tip: For maximum felting, use 100% wool. Okay, another thing to remember: No two items, knitted or crocheted alike will felt the same- for some reason…

I have to agree with Marykz, nothing wrong with questions at all and have fun felting… I love knitting and most of the needlearts because you are always learning something new!

Much thanks to both of you, Marykz and Myjoyoverflows for the helpful info and links! Mary

I love felting too!!! I can’t wait to make the next felted project. check out my blog.