Fair Isle Style Knitting

Had so much help on this forum to finish this sweater! I’m really new to knitting, have never knitted in the round before, never chart knitted and have never done fair isle style. As this was only my second attempt at knitting a Jersey it was a real challenge, but worth it. I got this pattern from Ravelry its a Norwegian designer called Tina Haugland / Strikkezilla. Totally reccomended. Beautiful patterns!

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Wow! You’ve done a fantastic job :blush:

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Well done. I’ve been knitting a lot longer and that puts me to shame. You can be proud of your accomplishment.

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Its not perfect if you look too close :face_with_hand_over_mouth:But I am happy with it and proud of myself for persevering.

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Looking good!! As you have discovered, knitting in the round, and in FI, is a great way to accomplish gorgeous designs very simply! In fact, all sweaters should be done this way… even cardigans! (My opinion only) Learn steeking now before you become set in your ways!

Knitting is knitting… and much easier if there are not many purls! Doing it in the round is faster for most knitters… in fact, I feel almost all knitting was done in the round in the old days, and then cut apart to make a blanket or anything else. Flat knitting came later on.

Your instructor will give you some great tips on how to do any stitch in the round. Take any class on FairIsle knitting… you will learn sooooo much!

I must find out what steeking is! Totally agree with your comment about knitting in tje round and the lack of having to pearl! It was this along with not having to stich my garment together at the end that appealed to me the most!

I would love a knitting instructor but alas I am totally self taught (unfortunately for me) in the art of knitting. Hence I turn to this forum and you tube an awfull lot to accomplish anything.

Why alas re self-taught? Many of us are and do quite nicely, thank you. I knew how to make knits and purls when I came across this wonderful site and got more help than I could have imagined from knitters of all levels of experience. As for steeking it may be the best thing since sliced bread for a predominately stockinette cardigan or for doing colorwork. The idea is to knit a tube then cut the center front open. It sounds terrifyingly scary and maybe stupid at first - I just knit it so why should I cut it? - but I practiced a bit then started a sweater. By the time I had the steeks reinforced (I used a crochet stitch) I was ready to cut that sucker open and had to make myself not hurry. It was soooooooo cool. Anyhow, if you decide to explore steeking I recommend checking out Arne and Carlos videos along with all the others you’ll find. Their video was what gave me the courage to go ahead and do it.

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Yes nothing wrong with self taught but there is nothing quite like sitting down with someone to show you the ropes rather than sitting on you tube. I totally agee about this site, I think almost all of my projects would not have been finished if it weren’t for tje help I have received.

You took the words right out of my mouth… Sounds terrifying to cut knitting :scream: But I’ll give it a go… Perhaps as you suggested on something small to start with.

I would love to have a fellow knitter close by to help me. I don’t. I refuse to feel like I can’t because I don’t. I do have other knitters online to converse with and all those wonderful videos and written tutorials an earlier generation would have been insanely envious of. We can do all things knitting, some we will be better at than others and that’s true of any knitter no matter what their learning situation is. I feel lucky to have the benefit of many teachers some of whom truly are experts. I am blessed to have you and others to share and learn with.

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This looks lovely. Received a Fair Isle pattern book for Christmas and trying to pluck up courage to actually knit from it. How many colours did you use.

That’s adorable!

Yes do it! Its seriously easier than it looks. I am really new to knitting, I’ve knitted about 4 hats one Jersey and a cardigan i never finished so I was really pleased with how this went. I only used 3 colours but most of the time you are working with 2 or one.

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Thank you :blush:

Nitsy, when you get a lot of help from others, how can you say you are
“totally self-taught”? If you read books, or watch UTube, you are
still being taught by someone! Self-taught means you invented knitting
all by yourself!

Steeking is not difficult, and it might be scary for some, but I don’t
know why. I am a weaver, and I cut into my fabric all the time; what
makes knitting so special that you can’t cut into it?

I would suggest (here is another teacher!) that you knit a swatch
about 20x20 cm, in stocking stitch. Mark out a “keyhole” with white
thread, and then cut inside those lines. Just make a slit with a hole
at the end. And then fold back the edge by one or two stitches, and
then pick up through both layers a row of stitches all around this
‘keyhole’. And there you have the button band around the front and
neck opening. Your first steek! Nothing to it.

Once you have done one, the rest are easy. Honest!

Fantastic job - looks great

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Thank you :blush:

Only you will know where the mistakes are. In the grand scheme of things, one or two (or more) mean nothing compared to the pride you have finishing this sweater. It is absolutely gorgeous and you should be so proud! Don’t you just love colorwork?

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You should be; I have found that knitting not only provides me with a fun and enjoyable hobby (and an end product that is tangible) but I learn new things about myself (I am 66) and how I approach challenges. Overcoming apprehension about doing something difficult is significant Well done, you!

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Thanks! Yes really enjoyed colour work.

That is a beautiful child’s jumper. Great job.

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