Eyeing my next project, need some advice!

I’m eyeing this cardigan for my next project (the one on the left): http://www.thevintageknittinglady.co.uk/images/07may09/bestway187a.gif

However, first I have to make a couple of choices, and I could really use some input on those.

I think I would like to knit the cardie with a contrast colour for the ribbing, pocket, collar and button bands. The button bands are knit as part of the sweater (so each row starts or ends w k1, p1 ribbing before/after the main pattern sts), what would be the best way of doing this in a contrast colour? Should I treat the button bands as vertical stripes? (After seeing the intarsia video, it looks like it would be relatively simple this way). Or is there a better strategy?

Also, what would be the pros and cons to adapting the pattern to knit in the round? I like the idea of knitting everything at once so I’m sure it’s even (and don’t have to seam), but on the other hand I’m not completely sure I’m ready for steeks!

Thank you so much for your input!!!

Very pretty!

If you’re going to knit the cardigan in the round, then you would definitely have to do steeks [U]and[/U] you would have to do intarsia in the round as well. I did a search on YouTube for intarsia in the round and found these. The method for in the round is a bit different than when worked flat–that is, what’s in the KH video, so do take a look at some of them before you jump in.

Personally, I would work this as one piece but not in the round; with this method, you still wouldn’t have any side seams–just shoulder seams, but you’d have those with steeks, too. Knitting it flat as one piece is easy enough to do, and you could include the different colored button bands as you go using regular old intarsia like what’s in the KH video.

The ribbing can be worked as a stripe, and the pocket can be knit at the same time as the ribbing (based on what I see in the picture). The collar can be added later in any color you choose.

I agree about knitting it flat, one piece. I don’t see anything to complicate knitting it all as one piece much. I’d perhaps add a “side seam” by slipping a stitch on the knit side where the side seam would be if there were one. I tried this recently and liked the result. I’d start by working the ribbing in the color I chose and then add the 2nd color for the main body at the appropriate spot. You’ll need two balls of the color for the fronts, one for each side, but that’s definitely doable. A three-needle bind off for the shoulders and those two seams are gone also. Looks like an interesting and fun knit.

There’s a cool way to make phony seams. I’ve done it and like it.

Jan, thanks for the link. That’s interesting. I’ll have to try it. I’m thinking doing it that way will make the faux seam more substantial. Is that the point of working two strands into one stitch?

I would work this as one piece but not in the round

That sounds great, I hadn’t thought of that! I would have to separate it in front and back pieces when I reach the armholes, is that right?

and the pocket can be knit at the same time as the ribbing

As far as I can tell from the pattern, the ribbing forms the front of the pocket, a few stitches are set aside to knit the pocket top, and a separate piece is knit and stitched in place to form the back of the pocket.

Actually, now that I’ve had a closer look at the pattern and the picture, I realize that the button bands, collar and pocket tops are in moss stitch, upon first look I thought everything was ribbed. Good thing that I see it now - knowing myself, I could have probably ripped it back several times before realizing I had read the pattern wrong! :slight_smile:

And I love the idea of faking the side seams!!

If you only do one strand then you’re really only fixing a dropped stitch and it does nothing. Worked this way it folds like a seam. It would work on a scarf knit in the round, too. Try it on a swatch!

I was thinking about the difference between this method and slipping a stitch every other row working in the round, on the knit side if knitted flat. I’ll do a swatch. Thats the best way to see the difference, I can do both on the same swatch for a side by side comparison.

Yes, you would need to divide up front left, front right, and back once you reach the arm shaping, but generally those go pretty fast. I’ve even used separate balls of yarn for each section and just continued knitting all the way across until I’ve completed everything at once.

I’ve even used separate balls of yarn for each section and just continued knitting all the way across until I’ve completed everything at once.

Another thing I wouldn’t have thought to do, but it sounds nice - when you’re done, you’re done.

Thanks!

One thing to be aware of when using separate balls of yarn to knit all the way across is that things can become a knotty mess if you’re not paying attention. I put each ball in a separate container and then made sure the ball I was getting ready to use was on the correct side (i.e., first in line and not twisted around any other strands). That was a bit of a pain, but really, it wasn’t too much trouble once you get used to rearranging containers every time you flip your work around.

You also have to pay particular attention to shaping and be sure you know which side is the sleeve side and which side is the neckline side. You most likely won’t have trouble with that since your button bands will be in a different color.

What’s the point I’d 3 skeins? It seems unnecessarily annoying to say nothing of the gap between yarns Wouldn’t markers work? That’s what I’d do.

I think she means working both fronts and back at the same time, each would require its own yarn. I don’t see how markers would make any difference in how many balls of yarn are needed. Working each piece separately would keep from needing multiple balls. I’m lost with the gap between yarns.

I was trying to figure it out based on the idea of knitting it seamlessly. Which I would still do over using 3 skeins. I’ve used multiple skeins at once for helix hats and it can be a pain to keep them from getting too tangled. I know you do two socks at once though so I’m sure it’s not as daunting to you.

I see! Yeah, the yarn can definitely get tangled but if I pay attention when I’m doing socks, it’s really minimal. Knitting all pieces at the same time or each alone, 3 needle bind offs will get rid of shoulder seaming. I’ve got to try the pick up and knit set-in sleeves still. Eliminating that seam sounds heavenly. I expect it could be done on this pattern if one knows how and is brave enough to try it.

I’d prefer knitting one sock on a circ as I think you do but I get mixed up on what to do on which one, when every time I try it. SSS keeps me from just doing one at a time.

That’s why I do two at once, but on SEPARATE needles. Do toe on both, then knit to gusset on both, etc. Otherwise I never get the second one done!

So you would do the entire cardigan in the round and then steek it?

Well, some of us aren’t very comfortable with steeks yet, which is why I do three separate balls of yarn when I get to the arm shaping divide. I did this with a sweater not too long ago, and it was quite easy to keep all the balls/yarn untangled–in fact, much more doable (at this point in my knitting life) than steeking. And I liked this a lot better than doing one side at a time, too.

It was just a recommendation: so take it or leave it!

I think I’ll probably try knitting all three pieces at once after dividing for the arms - and see if I can manage it or if it turns out a big fat mess! :slight_smile:

This’ll be my first go at 3 needle bind off as well, so I’ll have to get some dpns (which I have been putting off).

I’ve got to try the pick up and knit set-in sleeves still. Eliminating that seam sounds heavenly. I expect it could be done on this pattern if one knows how and is brave enough to try it.

I have to admit that I’m not crazy about picking up stitches either… I have had a nearly finished vest lying around in my knitting basket for quite a while now, it probably took me a month before I did the ribbing around the neckline, then it sat for another couple of months until I finally did the button bands this weekend. Now all that is left to do is the ribbing around the armholes, and I keep telling myself “tonight I’ll do it!” and then not doing it.

"This’ll be my first go at 3 needle bind off as well, so I’ll have to get some dpns (which I have been putting off)."
You’re getting the dpns just for the 3 needle bind off? You don’t need them (unless you’d like some for other reasons). You can slip the sts from the back shoulder onto any smaller size needle and then use one end of circular fot the front shoulder. Use the other end of the circular to knit the bind off. I’m assuming the circular is the needle you’ve used to knit fronts and back and it’s the only one that matters for the gauge of the bind off. You’ll love 3-needle bind off- so sturdy and neat looking.

Ah, that’s great! I’m actually looking forward to trying it out now :slight_smile: