Complete novice with a question about work as stitches appear

Hi,

I do apologize for wasting anyone’s time, especially if someone has already discussed this in the forums, but I’ve just started knitting and I’m teaching myself.

Can anyone explain what “work as stitches appear” means?

For example, I’m working on this pattern:

Row 1: k3, p3
Row 2: work as stitches appear
Row 3: p1, (k3,p3 until last five stitches), k3, p2
Row 4: work as stitches appear

Does this mean that I have to:

Row 1: k3, p3
Row 2: p3, k3
Row 3: p1, (k3,p3 until last five stitches), k3, p2
Row 4: k1, (p3,k3 until last five stitches), p3, k2

Thanks in advance!

yes thats just what it meens.

It is to work the stitches as they look on the side facing you. so if it looks like a knit stitch (a v) then you knit it and if it looks lie a purl stitch (a _) you purl it. This is some times written as ‘knit the knits and purl the purls’.

Thanks so much!

Wow! when I first started I would NEVER have figured that out. Don’t ever think a question would be a “waste of time”. Take it from another novice knitter…the knitters on here LOVE to help us! I think it’s kind of like campers. Do you ever notice that campers always seem to be so friendly and glad to help? I think knitters (and crocheters) are like that. And boy-oh-boy, do we ever give them plenty of opportunity to help!

So, while I’m at it…thanks knitters!:hug: :muah:

Um, actually I think it would be

Row 1: k3, p3
Row 2: k3, p3
Row 3: p1, (k3,p3 until last five stitches), k3, p2
Row 4: k2, p3 (k3, p3 until last st) k1

Unless you’re knitting in the round, you are coming back the other way on your alternate rows, so you have to work backwards.

Like this:
Row 1: -------------------->
Row 2: [COLOR=“Red”]<--------------------[/COLOR]
Row 3: -------------------->
Row 4: [COLOR=“Red”]<--------------------[/COLOR]

Best to learn how to identify your sts and work that way, rather than try to interpret the rows by what you worked previously.

sgtpam: ha, thanks for that. I’ll definitely be asking my fellow knitting campers a barrage of questions. I’m still on the quest to make my first decent scarf (I tried to make a dishcloth but I ended up picking so many stitches that it looked like some odd trapezium contraption of sorts).

Knit4pie: I’m trying to learn how to identify stitches but it’s clearly a slow and arduous process for me.

I have a question though: If I knit a stitch, it should look like a purl stitch from the other side, right? So if I knit the knits and purl the purls, shouldn’t I be purling that stitch (which looks like a purl stitch) when I get to my next row?

I’m thoroughly confused.

I have a question though: If I knit a stitch, it should look like a purl stitch from the other side, right? So if I knit the knits and purl the purls, shouldn’t I be purling that stitch (which looks like a purl stitch) when I get to my next row?

I’m thoroughly confused.

Yes, that’s right. As long as you remember that you’re turning your work when doing rows and coming from the opposite direction. So if for example you have a row that says: k1, p2, k3, p4, and on your next row it says to knit the knit and purl the purls, your next row would end up being : k4, p3, k2, p1.

If you’re doing rounds (circular knitting), then your second round would be the same as your first: k1, p2, k3, p4.

Recognizing the sts how they appear was a great help. Nearly all my projects had some sort of ribbing, and once I realized the difference in sts, I made less mistakes in ribbing…well, let’s say I didn’t have to necessarily wait 2 inches before noticing a mistake I made in my knitting. I could identify them sooner. Believe me, I even now still make mistakes!

Yes, the back of a stitch is the other stitch, so when you k 2 sts on row a, they look like purls on row b and you purl them. You knit the knits and purl the purls [B]as they appear on the row you’re working on now.[/B] Forget what you did to them on the previous row or you’ll drive yourself in circles.

[quote="“nrk”]
Hi,

I do apologize for wasting anyone’s time, especially if someone has already discussed this in the forums, but I’ve just started knitting and I’m teaching myself.

QUOTE]

Thank you for posting this question! Sometimes I get stuck on an idea and refuse to give it up. It takes someone else to smack me and see the light. I am obsessed with following a pattern and rarely relax enough to “look” at my knitting (though I am learning). This was the smack I needed to notice my stitches more and that it is ok to do so.:thumbsup: