Circular Knitting

Hi Knitters,

I have completed a couple of kids beanies on circular knitting needles and really like knitting on them for stocking stitch however have found that quite a few patterns I look at don’t call for a circular knitting needle…

I am wondering if you can just convert the pattern to the same size needle on circulars or if this will affect the pattern?

For e.g. the beanie I am currently working on calls for a 6.5mm needle and it will be 21 inches. If I knit this pattern again, could I just knit onto a 6.5mm 60cm circular needles? I think I read somewhere that there can be a difference in the tension or something like that when you are knitting on circulars but not sure if I just dreamt that… lol

Cheers,

nicknit_70

There can be a difference in tension between knitting on circs and straights, mostly in stockinette, because you don’t purl. I don’t see how much difference there would be in ribbing, though, because you’re doing the same thing whether it’s on circs or straights.

You can do a swatch that mimics circular knitting by casting on a circular needle for as wide as you want the swatch to be, but when you get to the end, don’t turn the work to purl back. Just slide the stitches to the other end, and let the yarn loop loosely across the back so you can knit across again.

Whether or not you need a swatch for a hat is really up to you, though.

Usually when you convert a flat pattern to circular, you take off a stitch from each end of the pattern. These would be included in the flat knitting as room for seaming.

There ususally is a little bit of a gauge difference b/t flat and circular knitting, but not too much. On something like a hat you shouldn’t have to worry. You might look at a couple of hat patterns in a similar yarn that are knit on circs just to compare the CO number if you really want to be sure.

There ususally is a little bit of a gauge difference b/t flat and circular knitting, but not too much. On something like a hat you shouldn’t have to worry. You might look at a couple of hat patterns in a similar yarn that are knit on circs just to compare the CO number if you really want to be sure.

Thanks Ingrid & Kemp!

That’s great advice from both of you and I am going to try starting on another beanie sometime in the next few days so this time I might just try it on a circular using your tips and see how I go.

You guys rock.

Cheers,

nicknit

Hi, I’ve got another question about converting from flat to circular knitting. I want to make a baby/child dress (the striped dress at the bottom of thispage). The increases in this pattern are worked at the end of rows, but in the circular patterns I’ve seen the increases/decreases are worked evenly all around. Should I try to change the location of the increases if I work it in the round?

Thanks,
Liz

I don’t think you should change where the increases/decreases are placed. If the decreases are placed at the beginning and ends of the rows in the pattern, it just means that the shaping is intended to be at the sides of the garment only.

I agree. Put a stitch marker halfway through the stitches for the other `seam’ and do the inc/dec at those two places.

sue

Thanks for the advice. I’ll just put the increases/decreases where the side seams would be then.

Liz

There is a book out there called. “Socks Saur on 2 Circular Needles” This book goes into explaining how to take the normal patterns and translate them to circular knitting. I am working on socks right now, they seem to come along much better than when working with dpn’s.

Amy has a video on the Advanced Techniques tab for knitting in the round with 2 circs; that may help some.