5 icons for a country ...BUT

Painted Desert - I couldn’t really do it justice trying to describe the colours - I can still see them as vividly now - one of those things that stay with you.

We were driving along a highway and stopped at the nearest pull-off point - got out of the car and just stood there, looking at those magical colours, like a wonderful masterpiece in a gallery.

That would have been beautiful. Truly :slight_smile: I was saying to someone before on a blog that stepping out to look at the night sky when you’re in the country and away from city lights is a whole new breathtaking experience.

But I was just thinking of a country like Poland. Aside from letters like Zbys sounding Spish…I know nothing really about the country. Again, perhaps its a media thing. But I was looking at an atlas recently and there were a couple of countries I hadn’t heard of. Perhaps more newly broken off and created nations but still.

Michael Palin (Monty Python bunch) has just started a new TV series about eastern Europe. He’s travelled the world, even did a series called ‘Around the World in 80 days’ but had not been to eastern Europe.

His first place was the former Yugoslavia - where Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia are getting back on their feet, after the war in the 1990s.

I’m sure Australia will get the new series soon.:thumbsup:

I’ll have a go!

Malta:
The Upper Barracca Gardens
Pastizzi
Lace Makers
Luzzu
Kinnie

Wow Chel…now THAT is a country I wouldn’t have expected…and the unexpected can be intriguing!

I know nothing about Malta aside from the large rock and the monkeys that apparently can be quite aggressive so interesting to know about lace making for example. However, aside from the gardens none of the other words connect for me. I COULD search for them of course but I’ve love to hear from you what they are and why you chose them.

My husband is from The Netherlands and I have been there 3 times so I will do The Netherlands:

  1. Tulips/flower bulbs
  2. Bicycles-[U]EVERYBODY[/U] is riding them there!
  3. Amsterdam-beautiful city!
  4. price of gas - “[COLOR=Black]With a price of E 1.48 per liter (which is about E 5.6 per gallon, or almost USD 7 per gallon), the gas price in Holland surpasses the gas price in other European countries.” (makes sense to ride a bike!) (http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/)
  5. Just all around a beautiful country, I love the canals, seeing the swan in them, the windmills, and seeing how different the cities are but in a good way![/COLOR][FONT=Verdana][SIZE=2][COLOR=#000066][FONT=Verdana][SIZE=2][/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

Ah yes, well, who can’t like Mr. Bean?:teehee: My kids like to re-enact scenes from Mr. Bean sometimes when they are playing. We think he is hilarious. I have a fondness for British Comedy in General. It just seems to fit in with my sense of humor.

figaro… I would have to spend a while cross comparing to our prices but we are about $1.68 a litre at the moment I think. I would normally know but my son has been doing the petrol runs lately. All the other elements I related to immediately. Books from my childhood illustrated the windmills and the tulips and yes, I hear the pushbike culture is really significant - perhaps encouraged also by the relatively flat landscape?

What food is associated with the Netherlands as nothing comes to my mind. I can see the women in those sort of caps with the ‘wings’ on the side and clogs of course.

mariblue…we could almost start another thread on British comedies. I have quite a collection of DVD’s at this point and love some dearly.

Switzerland: The Alps, Chocolate, World Bank, Heidi (like the book and/or movie with Shirley Temple) and watches.

I miss “Britcoms”. Our PBS doesn’t play them anymore…I LOVED Red Dwarf and have asked for the DVDs for three Christmases now. Also liked Black Adder, the show with Hyacinth Bucket (pronounced Bouquet, my dear!)…and of course, who doesn’t love them some Monty Python?

Misty

Oh…I SO remember my Heidi book…that really does take me back… :slight_smile: I loved that book. I also think of the neutrality Switzerland offered during WW2.

“Keeping up Appearances” is the name of the show with the ‘Bucket woman’ :slight_smile:

I had it on the tip of my tongue! Keeping up appearances!

Neutrality of Switzerland was my number 6 (number 7 was St. Bernards with kegs of whiskey around their necks!:teehee:)

Misty

  figaro.. I would have to spend a while cross comparing to our prices but we are about $1.68 a litre at the moment I think. I would normally know but my son has been doing the petrol runs lately. All the other elements I related to immediately. Books from my childhood illustrated the windmills and the tulips and yes, I hear the pushbike culture is really significant - perhaps encouraged also by the relatively flat landscape?

What food is associated with the Netherlands as nothing comes to my mind. I can see the women in those sort of caps with the ‘wings’ on the side and clogs of course.
The foods that come to my mind are “[B]Kroket and frikandel[/B]: both are fried, roll-formed snacks containing (some kind of) meat. Available at any snackbar and not advisable for vegetarians”(kinda interesting and you can get a McKroket from McDonalds over there!), [B]Patat[/B]: patat or ‘french fries’ may not be an exclusively Dutch food, but the thickness of the french fry itself and the fact that it is very often eaten with mayonaise ('patat met(‘patat with’) is french fries with mayonaise) does make some foreigners stare. Even more extreme is a ‘patatje oorlog’ - literally meaning “french fries war” - indicating french fries with mayonaise and saté-sauce. ‘patat speciaal’ is french fries, mayonnaise, ketchup and raw onions. Patat in all its varieties can be obtained in any snackbar., [B]Drop[/B]: a sweet (liquorice) that comes in a very large number of different forms and tastes, from salt and hard to soft and sweet. It is very popular among the entire Dutch population and is claimed to have something of an addictive-effect if eaten regularly in very large quantities.(not one of my favs but my husband loves them), [B]Poffertjes[/B]: these resemble very small pancakes and are traditionally served warm with lots of powdered sugar sprinkled on top. You can make them at home if you have a special pan" (found at http://www.thehollandring.com/food.shtml) And then there are pannekoekens which are a thin, large hybrid of a crepe and pancake that can be topped with savory or sweet items.

And I can’t forget my MIL’s homemade tomato soup made with homegrown tomato’s, a bone with marrow in it and small meatballs on the bottom! YUM!

Thanks for that figaro. As I was reading I could see the origins (perhaps) of Afrikaans. I love chips (french fries) with different sauces and I wouldn’t find it at all odd to see mayonnaise used as a type of dipping sauce. I found the McKroket fascinating! Interesting how pancake variations are found in many countries in one form or another.

Someone said yesterday to me that Australia and NZ don’t really have a ‘cuisine’ as such; nothing internationally recognised. I think it fairly hard for relatively young countries to achieve that. We tend to have a lot of fusion cooking here with so many regional influences but good seafood and good steak is also part of what I guess is considered our fare. We do have wonderful native plants for eating but few restaurants would be noted for serving them as such in a specialist manner.

How about two countries:

Israel-The Western wall, Masada, The Dome of the Rock,shwarma and felafel stands, the security fence.

Canada-Hockey, beer, CN tower, the expression “eh?” and the RCMP.

?Vegamite :slight_smile:

Ahhh, Vegemite. That’s interesting stuff.

Well, no ones done it yet, and as a Kiwi, I suppose I have to throw New Zealand in here some where lol, least we be forgotten … AGAIN :stuck_out_tongue:

  1. Fish n Chips
  2. Weetbix
  3. Old farm utes
  4. Red socks
  5. Space, lots and lots of space. Just large areas or nothing, its veery nice!

(and no, I didnt say sheep, why? because I figured they were a given :P)

Hi Jeremy,

Thanks for contribution. What does the Canadian acronym represent? I smiled at the ‘eh’. I think NZ’ers tend to do that also…??

Masada and Dome of the Rock I didn’t know either.

Pudify… Now your list is interesting as I always think of fish and chips having a British heritage…although here we would joke that you have fush and chups of course :slight_smile:

Weet bix I would have claimed as one of ours and utes :slight_smile:

The red socks were a surprise. Why are red socks associated with NZ??

It looks a beautiful country to me. The Marlborough region where the wineries are looks delightful.